Posted by: rearadmiral | January 19, 2014

Questions, Questions, Questions!??! ?????!!!!!

My favorite composer, Ralph Vaughan Williams(RVW), called his life’s work a “Morality”(Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress). Despite loving Sarah Emsley’s blog…I can’t call MP a “Tragedy”. True it is not a “Comedy”. Therefore, I shall call Mansfield Park a “Morality”. -Kirk 

http://sarahemsley.com/2014/01/17/mansfield-park-is-a-tragedy-not-a-comedy/

Mansfield Park is a Tragedy, Not a Comedy

sarahemsley.com

I’m really excited about discussing Mansfield Park with all of you this year – so excited that I can’t wait until May 9th, when my series of guest posts on the novel launches, to start the conversa…
 

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=723808360976098&set=a.480496068640663.109952.466897703333833&type=1&theater
 
Lots of Jane stuff at the Morgan Library in NYC!
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Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
 
Sunday, March 2 at 11:00am
 
  • Some amusing comments:
  •  Ahh, that Russian angst!
    Unlike · Reply · 1 · 4 hours ago
  •  WHAT HAPPENED?! New roles!
    Emma, Love and Friendship, and Mansfield Park at the Morgan Library in NYC. No flash was allowed.
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     “What is Jane Fairfax’s ‘daily errand’?
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    A walk to the post-office-even in the driving rain. John Knightley, who quizzes her about this chore, seems, astute investigating barrister that he is, to know that something secret is involved. Has he told his brother George? And did Mr Knightley put two and two together?

    -“So You Think You Know Jane Austen: A Literary Quizbook” by John Sutherland & Deirdre Le Faye pg 191

     
    “What is the last expression which Edmund sees on Mary’s face before leaving her for ever?
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    ‘A saucy, playful smile’. He is tempted, but ‘walks on’-on Fanny whose smiles, whatever else, are never saucy”.

    -“So You Think You Know Jane Austen: A Literary Quizbook” by John Sutherland & Deirdre Le Faye

     
    We are readers. We don’t just love books, we cherish them. We don’t just want books, we need them. We don’t just read books, we are the characters in the books. We feel their happiness, their pain, their losses, and their gains. Reading isn’t just a hobby, it’s who we are. We are readers.
     
    “What is Fanny Price’s favourite reading?”
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    Poetry, biography, and improving essays. Not, definitely not, fiction. 

    -“So You Think You Know Jane Austen: A Literary Quizbook” by John Sutherland & Deirdre Le Faye pg 160 

     
    Happy Bday Abigail Reynolds!!!!!!! A wonderful book with a wonderful cover! I love that “Lady Nauset”(my name for the lighthouse) is in the background!
    Photo: Happy Bday Abigail Reynolds!!!!!!! A wonderful book with a wonderful cover! I love that "Lady Nauset"(my name for the lighthouse) is in the background!
     
    “Where did Tom Bertram meet the Honourable John Yates?(scroll down for the answer)
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    At Weymouth, playground of wastrels in Austen’s fiction.

    -“So You Think You Know Jane Austen: A Literary Quizbook” by John Sutherland & Deirdre Le Faye pg 161

     
    *Having left the Martin’s farm, he heads in the direction of Donwell Abbey. As he walks past the fields, he finds himself turning the wrong way and walking another familiar path, the road to Hartfield. He hopes Mr. Woodhouse and Emma were already at breakfast. Smiles as he quickens his pace.*
    Photo: *Having left the Martin's farm, he heads in the direction of Donwell Abbey.  As he walks past the fields, he finds himself turning the wrong way and walking another familiar path, the road to Hartfield.  He hopes Mr. Woodhouse and Emma were already at breakfast.   Smiles as he quickens his pace.*
     
    Was just asked about my interest in starting a local Jane Austen book club at a tea shop. I have a few JA related books in mind, but I know there are TONS out there that I’m not even familiar with. Could you recommend any, or a website that may have a good list/place to start? Thanks!


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      Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club Angela, most of our past books are also under our Events section on the blog:https://janeausteninboston.wordpress.com/events/ . Let us know how your book club comes along! -Shirley
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      Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club Congrats! You certainly can borrow from us. Our books are under the “Notes” section of FB. Austenprose reviews fiction and non-fiction. Austenesque Reviews, I think, does mostly fiction. Austen Authors is another!(I’m a big fan of Jane Odiwe and Abigail Reynolds)… “Jane’s Fame” by Claire Harmon, “Among the Janeites” by Deborah Yaffe , Carol Shields Bio of Jane. “Jane Fairfax” by Joan Aiken, “The Family Fortune” by Laurie Horowitz, Margaret C Sullivan blog and book, Sarah Emsley blog. Cheers! -Kirk
      If you’re an Edith Wharton fan, a Downton Abbey fan, or even a Gossip Girl fan, we suggest you view “The Buccaneers” and take a look at the below article, which analyzes it.

      http://artisan-denizen.blogspot.com/2014/01/pd-26-buccaneers-by-edith-wharton.html

      Photo: If you're an Edith Wharton fan, a Downton Abbey fan, or even a Gossip Girl fan, we suggest you view "The Buccaneers" and take a look at the below article, which analyzes it.

http://artisan-denizen.blogspot.com/2014/01/pd-26-buccaneers-by-edith-wharton.html
       
      “This relates to a larger and perplexing feature of Sense and Sensibility-what one might call the ‘Chinese whispers effect’. We never directly witness momentous events in the novel: the seduction of Eliza Williams, or the duel between Brandon and Willoughby, for example. These things, like earthquakes in a neighbouring country, can only be known seismographically. It is, depending on the reader’sconstitution, one of the pleasures-or frustrations-of reading Austen. It is a tribute to her ethical conviction as an artist that she never writes about things of which she has no direct or(more typically) personal knowledge” -“So You Think You Know Jane Austen: A Literary Quizbook” by John Sutherland & Deirdre Le Faye pg96
       
      LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
      Oh, cielo!
      Ahahahahahahhahhah
      Photo: Oh, cielo!
Ahahahahahahhahhah
       
      The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
      Depend upon it, you see but half. You see the evil, but you do not see the consolation. There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere–and those evil-minded observers, dearest Mary, who make much of a little, are more taken in and deceived than the parties themselves.”
      Mrs. Grant, Mansfield Park
      Photo: The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
Depend upon it, you see but half. You see the evil, but you do not see the consolation. There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere--and those evil-minded observers, dearest Mary, who make much of a little, are more taken in and deceived than the parties themselves."
Mrs. Grant, Mansfield Park
       
      « I miei personaggi avranno, 
      dopo qualche difficoltà,
      tutto ciò che desiderano… »

      ~Becoming Jane

      Photo: « I miei personaggi avranno, 
dopo qualche difficoltà,
tutto ciò che desiderano... »

<3

~Becoming Jane

Responses

  1. Hi Kirk,

    I’m sorry hear that I haven’t persuaded you … yet! Maybe the longer version of the essay will be more effective. It should be out later this year.

    There are so many links between MP and The Pilgrim’s Progress — I’d like to write more about that sometime.

  2. Hi Sarah,

    You can lead a horse to water……I’ll give the longer version a read….and even will try to keep an open mind! And I don’t say that about all essays/authors 🙂 Perhaps Marcia Fulsom will have copies available by the March or May JASNA MA meetings.

    I love your comment about MP and The Pilgrim’s Progress. RVW comes at The Pilgrim’s Progress perhaps alittle differently than Bunyan would have wanted it(RVW was probably an Agnostic).

    RVW and Jane Austen fun fact: One and only statue(as of three yrs ago) to RVW is in Dorking….the town that Box Hill is partly in. RVW lived in Dorking for about 25 years as an adult and grew up 6 miles from Box Hill at Leith Hill Place. It was a thrill to visit Box Hill and then RVW’s statue a while back.

  3. I just saw your comment now. Thanks very much for your interest in the longer version. And thanks also for sharing the link to my blog post on JA and the Penderwicks – I love those books. Box Hill! Lucky you.

    • Thanks for reading my comments(as out there they be may)! Yes, Box Hill. Cheers!


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