Posted by: rearadmiral | February 2, 2014

A Super Week?? Super-sized post!! Bowled over?

She spells her name differently but some nice art. 

http://www.janeaustin.co.uk/originals.html

From Goodreads:

“No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be a heroine… But from fifteen to seventeen she was in training for a heroine…”

― Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

Photo: From Goodreads:

“No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be a heroine... But from fifteen to seventeen she was in training for a heroine...”

― Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey
 
The Collins didn’t see his shadow! I declare this Winter of Discontent and foul weather…..O-V-E-R! #US Groundhog Day
Photo: The Collins didn't see his shadow! I declare this Winter of Discontent and foul weather.....O-V-E-R! #US Groundhog Day
 
 
The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
“Nay,” said Edmund, who began to listen with alarm. “Let us do nothing by halves. If we are to act, let it be in a theatre completely fitted up with pit, boxes, and gallery, and let us have a play entire from beginning to end; so as it be a German play, no matter what, with a good tricking, shifting afterpiece, and a figure-dance, and a hornpipe, and a song between the acts. If we do not outdo Ecclesford, we do nothing.”

“Now, Edmund, do not be disagreeable,” said Julia. “Nobody loves a play better than you do, or can have gone much farther to see one.”

“True, to see real acting, good hardened real acting; but I would hardly walk from this room to the next to look at the raw efforts of those who have not been bred to the trade: a set of gentlemen and ladies, who have all the disadvantages of education and decorum to struggle through.”

 
#PrideandPrejudice Reference #2: #YouveGotMail

“The heroine of Pride and Prejudice is Elizabeth Bennet and she’s one of the greatest, most complex characters ever written, not that you would know.” (Kathleen Kelly,You’ve Got Mail)

Photo: #PrideandPrejudice Reference #2: #YouveGotMail

"The heroine of Pride and Prejudice is Elizabeth Bennet and she's one of the greatest, most complex characters ever written, not that you would know." (Kathleen Kelly, You've Got Mail)
 
“She would notice her; she would improve her; she would detach her from her bad acquaintances, and introduce her into good society; she would form her opinions and her manners. It would be an interesting, and certainly a very kind undertaking; highly becoming her own station in life, her leisure, and powers (21)”. This quote shows how Emma thinks about her new friend Harriet, and how she plans to ‘help’ her. Emma does indeed try to form Harriet’s opinions for a while, and Harriet lets her. From:http://www.novelguide.com/emma/top-ten-quotes

The painting below is more brilliance from @Colin Lees: All the result are in and they confirm what I suspected: this is THE painting of Harriet Smith executed by Emma! Wow!

Photo: "She would notice her; she would improve her; she would detach her from her bad acquaintances, and introduce her into good society; she would form her opinions and her manners.  It would be an interesting, and certainly a very kind undertaking; highly becoming her own station in life, her leisure, and powers (21)".  This quote shows how Emma thinks about her new friend Harriet, and how she plans to 'help' her.  Emma does indeed try to form Harriet's opinions for a while, and Harriet lets her. From: http://www.novelguide.com/emma/top-ten-quotes

The painting below is more brilliance from @Colin Lees: All the result are in and they confirm what I suspected: this is THE painting of Harriet Smith executed by Emma! Wow!
 
Reason eight million four hundred thousand and one why Karen’s suggestion of reading “The Marriage Plot” was brilliant!!!

“The “marriage plot” has, thankfully, been scrutinized and questioned by some of the aforementioned works—and was perhaps most specifically critiqued by Jeffrey Eugenides’s best-selling 2011 novel The Marriage Plot. Nevertheless, selective omission has successfully kept this perfect, neatly two-dimensional story—of the heterosexual single woman finding happiness by becoming single no longer, welcoming a child, and creating a family—intact.”

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/01/when-a-marriage-plot-doesnt-mean-a-happy-ending/283418/

 
 

A Passion for Dead Leaves: Jane Austen and The Penderwicks
sarahemsley.com
Sense and Sensibility was published two hundred and one years ago today, and I thought of Jane Austen’s heroine Marianne Dashwood this past weekend when I went hiking with my family and we listened…
 
From Goodreads: “It is not everyone,’ said Elinor, ‘who has your passion for dead leaves.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sense and Sense 

“I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

“It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

The Dashwood Sisters!

http://www.multimedialibrary.org/dulwich-picture-gallery/best-of-british/the-linley-sisters

Photo: From Goodreads:                                                                                            “It is not everyone,' said Elinor, 'who has your passion for dead leaves.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sense and Sense 

"I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

“It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.” 
― Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

The Dashwood Sisters!

http://www.multimedialibrary.org/dulwich-picture-gallery/best-of-british/the-linley-sisters
 
I like Deborah Yaffe’s review of Joan Aiken’s completion of the unfinished “The Watson”. However, Joan Aiken does one thing in her completion that I think should NEVER happen in a sequal/completion(Deborah doesn’t agree with me).

http://www.deborahyaffe.com/#/blog/4572569917/The-Watsons-in-Winter-Joan-Aiken/7151780

Deborah Yaffe
deborahyaffe.moonfruit.com
Among the Janeites: A Journey Through the World of Jane Austen Fandom is an affectionate and entertaining nonfiction look at the quirky subculture of rabid Jane Austen fans – the kind of people who wear Regency costume to Jane Austen festivals, spend hours 

Twitter / HCIndyThinking: The future’s bright…NEW PROOFS …
twitter.com
 
@Mary Josephine Crawley quite rightly points out that Margaret Hale and John Thornton from North and South should be on this list!

http://www.bookish.com/articles/couples-whose-love-reminds-us-of-elizabeth-and-darcy

Couples Whose Love Reminds Us of Elizabeth and Darcy
In vain they struggled, but it wouldn’t do. Their feelings would not be repressed, and as readers, we eagerly read on as their love overcame them and finally culminated in moments of passion and truth. In honor of the 150th anniversary of Pride and Prejudice’s publication, allow us to share how arde…
 
I forgive him, ok I’ll forget, his anti-Marianne comments 

30) Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen. This is the most perfect novel ever written by a human being from the planet Earth. That is all.

http://newsoutherngentleman.wordpress.com/2014/01/01/the-2014-reading-list/

 
I have been posting paintings from Thomas Lawrence the past few days and wanted to add some info. More to come! -Kirk

Wonderful info from Austenonly.com:

But before I get too carried away…what has this to do with Jane Austen? He never painted her and moved in much more fashionable circles than even Henry Austen could aspire to, so why should Lawrence’s works interest us? Well, many of the people Lawrence painted were household names and Jane Austen would have been wholly familiar with them and no doubt interested to view their portraits painted in such a vibrant manner. But something else connects Austen and Lawrence. Quite simply, he was one of her greatest admires, knew Sir Walter Scott (also an admirer)and received advance copies of popular novels from her publisher, John Murray. Here is an account of his literary tastes by Miss Elizabeth Croft which was contained in Sir Thomas Lawrence’s Letter Bag published in 1906:

She wrote:

From the year 1810 to 1821, Sir Thomas was in habits of the most constant and intimate intercourse with me and my friends in Hart Street, dropping in at all hours, and especially of an evening when too much tired with the labours of the day to accept the invitations of gayer and more exalted friends…Frequently he would bring with him the novel or periodical of the day-and who ever read like him! Most of Sir Walter Scot’s works we had the delight of hearing from his lips and I can never forget the charm of his reading “Marmion” to us. They were all sent to him and a few other chosen friends by the author before they were published, and at the same time that a copy was sent to George the 4th. Thus we were enabled to laugh in our sleeve at persons who roundly reported that Walter Scot was not the real author…Many of Miss Austen’s novels he also read to us, and she was one of his favourite writers.

http://austenonly.com/2010/10/28/my-review-of-thomas-lawrence-regency-power-and-brilliance-at-the-national-portrait-gallery/

 
Sarah Emsley (@Sarah_Emsley) tweeted at 9:13 PM on Fri, Jan 24, 2014:
“I do not pretend to set people right, but I do see that they are often wrong.” –Mary Crawford #MansfieldPark200#FridayFanny

(https://twitter.com/Sarah_Emsley/status/426900548390883328)

Sarah Emsley (@Sarah_Emsley) tweeted at 6:26 AM on Mon, Jan 27, 2014:
“I’ve seen the razzle-dazzle colours of the low-lying scarlet bushes in the fall, …
(https://twitter.com/Sarah_Emsley/status/427764572338925568)

Sarah Emsley (@Sarah_Emsley) tweeted at 6:27 AM on Mon, Jan 27, 2014:
… blazing against the black of the spruce trees and the bluest sky in the world.” – #BudgeWilson @AmyDMathers#MarathonofBooks
(https://twitter.com/Sarah_Emsley/status/427764823057649664)

 
A Sensible Girl…Jane Austen Criticizes Romanticism…
newsoutherngentleman.wordpress.com
Marianne Dashwood, the epitome of sensibility, is the heroine Jane Austen most disapproves of… The six complete Jane Austen novels divide into three interesting pairs. There are the “place” title…
 

Sweet Jane…and the problems of writing
newsoutherngentleman.wordpress.com
And so we come to Jane Austen. Be forewarned. I have read each of Austen’s novels at least 10 times – some more. I wrote my master’s thesis on Austen’s novels (using Rogerian theory as a device to …
 
From @Colin Lees “I here present to you ‘Miss Emma Woodhouse’ (aka Lady Selina Meade) painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence!”

http://www.shmoop.com/emma/emma-woodhouse.html

Emma’s not vain about her looks, although Mr. Knightley and Mrs. Weston are pretty sure that she could be. If Emma does posses an over-inflated ego (and let’s face it, she REALLY does), it’s because of her smarts. In fact, it’s probably not coincidental that Emma herself is the first person to comment on her all-too healthy sense of self. Here are her own thoughts on the matter:”How improperly had she been acting by Harriet! How inconsiderate, how indelicate, how irrational, how unfeeling had been her conduct! What blindness, what madness, had led her on! It struck her with dreadful force, and she was ready to give it every bad name in the world.”

Here she is again, just a few moments later: “Every moment had brought a fresh surprize; and every surprize must be matter of humiliation to her.—How to understand it all! How to understand the deceptions she had been thus practising on herself, and living under!—The blunders, the blindness of her own head and heart!—”

Photo: From @Colin Lees "I here present to you 'Miss Emma Woodhouse' (aka Lady Selina Meade) painted by Sir Thomas Lawrence!"

http://www.shmoop.com/emma/emma-woodhouse.html

Emma’s not vain about her looks, although Mr. Knightley and Mrs. Weston are pretty sure that she could be. If Emma does posses an over-inflated ego (and let’s face it, she REALLY does), it’s because of her smarts. In fact, it’s probably not coincidental that Emma herself is the first person to comment on her all-too healthy sense of self. Here are her own thoughts on the matter:"How improperly had she been acting by Harriet! How inconsiderate, how indelicate, how irrational, how unfeeling had been her conduct! What blindness, what madness, had led her on! It struck her with dreadful force, and she was ready to give it every bad name in the world."

Here she is again, just a few moments later: "Every moment had brought a fresh surprize; and every surprize must be matter of humiliation to her.—How to understand it all! How to understand the deceptions she had been thus practising on herself, and living under!—The blunders, the blindness of her own head and heart!—"
 

REVIEW: Pride & Prejudice: Keepsake Edition (Blu-ray)
REVIEW: Pride & Prejudice: Keepsake Edition (Blu-ray)
 
Happy 201st Bday P&P!!! A great post from last year’s 200th Bday. 

http://www.culturekicks.co.uk/2013/01/28/a-tweet-universally-acknowledged/

 
http://www.amazon.com/Knightley-Chili-Slaw-Austen-Takes-Volume/dp/0615827292

4 Regency teacups out of 5
It was a freebie on Amazon. Emma set in Mississippi. I found it charming…perhaps because I was just in Mississippi a couple of weeks ago. Went to Vicksburg. The version I read was a first “edition”. The author posted recently that she revised it. The ending was rather quick. -Kirk

Emma, Mr. Knightley, and Chili-Slaw Dogs (Austen Takes the South) (Volume 2)
Caroline Ashley is a journalist on the rise at the Washington Post until the sudden death of her father brings her back to Thorny Hollow to care for her mentally fragile mother. The only respite from the eternal rotation of bridge club meetings and garden parties is her longtime friend, Brooks El…
@Colin Lees “Extensive research has led me to this painting by Lawrence, which is clearly of Mr Woodhouse. So far my quest for Harriet Smith has failed to bear fruit.”

From www.shmoop.com:

“Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs. An egg boiled very soft is not unwholesome. Serle understands boiling an egg better than any body. I would not recommend an egg boiled by any body else; but you need not be afraid, they are very small, you see—one of our small eggs will not hurt you. Miss Bates, let Emma help you to a little bit of tart—a very little bit. Ours are all apple-tarts. You need not be afraid of unwholesome preserves here. I do not advise the custard. Mrs. Goddard, what say you to half a glass of wine? A small half-glass, put into a tumbler of water? I do not think it could disagree with you.”

Photo: @Colin Lees "Extensive research has led me to this painting by Lawrence, which is clearly of Mr Woodhouse. So far my quest for Harriet Smith has failed to bear fruit."

From www.shmoop.com:

"Mrs. Bates, let me propose your venturing on one of these eggs. An egg boiled very soft is not unwholesome. Serle understands boiling an egg better than any body. I would not recommend an egg boiled by any body else; but you need not be afraid, they are very small, you see—one of our small eggs will not hurt you. Miss Bates, let Emma help you to a little bit of tart—a very little bit. Ours are all apple-tarts. You need not be afraid of unwholesome preserves here. I do not advise the custard. Mrs. Goddard, what say you to half a glass of wine? A small half-glass, put into a tumbler of water? I do not think it could disagree with you."
 
“That Lucy had certainly meant to deceive, to go off with a flourish of malice against him in her message by Thomas, was perfectly clear to Elinor”….

David M. Shapard’s note in The Annotated Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen: Annotated and Edited by David M Shapard says:

“Lucy’s malice was principally directed against Edward rather than Elinor. The reason would be her anger that he came to prefer another. She may have thought that making Elinor unhappy would be a way of inflicting harm on Edward, or that Elinor’s false belief about his marriage would lead her to actions or words that would injure Edward or create difficulties for him. The deception also shows the malice of Robert, who had no cause to hurt Edward or Elinor, for it required him to remain quiet and hidden away in the carriage, a reversal of his normal behavior, and allow Thomas to believe that he was Edward”. Lucy Steele = Pure Evil!!!! -Kirk

 
 
– Adesso siate sincero; mi ammiravate per la mia impertinenza? 
– Vi ammiravo per la vivacità della vostra mente. 

Orgoglio e Pregiudizio

Photo: - Adesso siate sincero; mi ammiravate per la mia impertinenza? 
- Vi ammiravo per la vivacità della vostra mente. 

Orgoglio e Pregiudizio
 
@Colin Lees has found this painting by Sir Thomas Lawrence and suspects it to be Lizzy!! “Found her. Google claims that this is Lawrence’s portrait of Rosamund Hester Elizabeth Pennell Croker but I believe that further research will establish conclusively that it’s actually Miss Elizabeth Bennet of Longbourn…..”

Congrats Colin!!! You have succeeded where Jane Austen herself failed. “…..Henry & I went to the Exhibition in Spring Gardens. It is not thought a good collection, but I was very well pleased-particularly(pray tell Fanny) with a small portrait of Mrs Bingley, excessively like her. I went in hopes of seeing one of her Sister, but there was no Mrs. Darcy;-perhaps however, I may find her in the Great Exhibition which we shall go to, if we have time;-I have no chance of her in the collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds’s Paintings which is now shewing in Pall Mall, & which we are also to visit.-Mrs Bingley’s is exactly herself, size, shaped, face, features & sweetness; there never was a greater likeness. She is dressed in a white gown, with green ornaments, which convinces me of what I had always supposed, that green was a favourite colour with her. I dare say Mrs D will be in Yellow……” Later in the same letter…..”We have been both to the Exhibition & Sir J. Reynolds’,-and I am disappointed, for there was nothing like Mrs D. at either.-I can only imagine that Mr D. prizes any Picture of her too much to like it should be exposed to public eye.-I can imagine he would have that sort[of omitted] feeling-that mixture of Love, Pride & Delicacy.”- JA to Cassandra Austen May 24, 1813. pg 220 “Jane Austen’s Letters” 4th Edition Collected and Edited by Deirdre Le Faye

Photo: @Colin Lees has found this painting by Sir Thomas Lawrence and suspects it to be Lizzy!! "Found her. Google claims that this is Lawrence's portrait of Rosamund Hester Elizabeth Pennell Croker but I believe that further research will establish conclusively that it's actually Miss Elizabeth Bennet of Longbourn....."

Congrats Colin!!! You have succeeded where Jane Austen herself failed. ".....Henry & I went to the Exhibition in Spring Gardens. It is not thought a good collection, but I was very well pleased-particularly(pray tell Fanny) with a small portrait of Mrs Bingley, excessively like her. I went in hopes of seeing one of her Sister, but there was no Mrs. Darcy;-perhaps however, I may find her in the Great Exhibition which we shall go to, if we have time;-I have no chance of her in the collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds's Paintings which is now shewing in Pall Mall, & which we are also to visit.-Mrs Bingley's is exactly herself, size, shaped, face, features & sweetness; there never was a greater likeness. She is dressed in a white gown, with green ornaments, which convinces me of what I had always supposed, that green was a favourite colour with her. I dare say Mrs D will be in Yellow......" Later in the same letter....."We have been both to the Exhibition & Sir J. Reynolds',-and I am disappointed, for there was nothing like Mrs D. at either.-I can only imagine that Mr D. prizes any Picture of her too much to like it should be exposed to public eye.-I can imagine he would have that sort[of omitted] feeling-that mixture of Love, Pride & Delicacy."- JA to Cassandra Austen May 24, 1813. pg 220 "Jane Austen's Letters" 4th Edition Collected and Edited by Deirdre Le Faye
 
From 1/27:
Happy Happy Happy Happy Bday Rosamund Pike!!!!!!! I heart Rosamund!!!! -Kirk
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