Posted by: rearadmiral | February 8, 2014

And the Gold Medal goes to…..Mansfield Park(???!!!!)

Elizabeth Bennet Darcy!!! Not the dull Lizzy written in Boredom Comes to Pemberley! -Kirk
Photo: Elizabeth Bennet Darcy!!! Not the dull Lizzy written in Boredom Comes to Pemberley! -Kirk
 
Mary C: “You had better tell Miss Bertram to think of Mr. Rushworth. It may do her some good. I often think of Mr. Rushworth’s property and independence, and wish them in other hands; but I never think of him. A man might represent the county with such an estate; a man might escape a profession and represent the county.”

Mrs. G: “I dare say he will be in parliament soon. When Sir Thomas comes, I dare say he will be in for some borough, but there has been nobody to put him in the way of doing anything yet.”

 
Two great Janeites….lol, wish they agreed with me….on anything 

http://sarahemsley.com/2014/02/06/the-watsons-in-winter-an-interview-with-deborah-yaffe/

“The Watsons in Winter”: An Interview with Deborah Yaffe
sarahemsley.com
Deborah Yaffe, author of Among the Janeites: A Journey Through the World of Jane Austen Fandom, is writing about “The Watsons in Winter” on her blog, exploring the fragment of the novel Jane Austen…
 
From http://www.shmoop.com/persuasion/lady-russell.html:

“That Lady Russell, of steady age and character, and extremely well provided for, should have no thought of a second marriage, needs no apology to the public, which is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not; but Sir Walter’s continuing in singleness requires explanation. (1.9)”

Lady Russell

Character Analysis
Lady Russell is the queen of advice. Love troubles? Money troubles? She’s on it. Her methods, however, are not always to her advisees’ liking. While Anne generously gives her the benefit of the doubt in recalling her old friend’s advice to give up on Captain Wentworth, Sir Walter is less obliging when she offers to help him with his budget woes. Still, she perseveres in trying to save the Elliots from themselves.

It seems a bit strange that Lady Russell doesn’t just stick to Anne – the only one of the Elliots who actually likes her and listens to her advice – and leave the others to their fate. Why does Lady Russell care for the Elliots so much? One reason could be that her strong affection for Anne gives her an interest in making sure that the other Elliots don’t mess things up for Anne. A second reason is her “value for rank and consequence, which blind[s] her a little to the faults of those who possessed them” (2.2). Lady Russell’s continuing friendship with the Elliots is based on both personal merit (of Anne and the late Lady Elliot) and social rank (Sir Walter’s title), combining these two systems which clash throughout the novel. Lady Russell does, however, seem pretty bad at seeing personal merit without a high social rank to back it up (case in point: Captain Wentworth).

At the end of the novel, Lady Russell has to undergo an entire mental makeover, realizing that she was totally wrong about both Mr. Elliot and Captain Wentworth. That she manages to do so fairly easily shows that she thinks more of Anne’s happiness than of being right, though it remains uncertain whether the same was true of her earlier acts of persuasion.
Lady Russell!

Photo: From http://www.shmoop.com/persuasion/lady-russell.html:

"That Lady Russell, of steady age and character, and extremely well provided for, should have no thought of a second marriage, needs no apology to the public, which is rather apt to be unreasonably discontented when a woman does marry again, than when she does not; but Sir Walter's continuing in singleness requires explanation. (1.9)"

Lady Russell

Character Analysis
Lady Russell is the queen of advice. Love troubles? Money troubles? She’s on it. Her methods, however, are not always to her advisees’ liking. While Anne generously gives her the benefit of the doubt in recalling her old friend’s advice to give up on Captain Wentworth, Sir Walter is less obliging when she offers to help him with his budget woes. Still, she perseveres in trying to save the Elliots from themselves.

It seems a bit strange that Lady Russell doesn’t just stick to Anne – the only one of the Elliots who actually likes her and listens to her advice – and leave the others to their fate. Why does Lady Russell care for the Elliots so much? One reason could be that her strong affection for Anne gives her an interest in making sure that the other Elliots don’t mess things up for Anne. A second reason is her "value for rank and consequence, which blind[s] her a little to the faults of those who possessed them" (2.2). Lady Russell’s continuing friendship with the Elliots is based on both personal merit (of Anne and the late Lady Elliot) and social rank (Sir Walter’s title), combining these two systems which clash throughout the novel. Lady Russell does, however, seem pretty bad at seeing personal merit without a high social rank to back it up (case in point: Captain Wentworth).

At the end of the novel, Lady Russell has to undergo an entire mental makeover, realizing that she was totally wrong about both Mr. Elliot and Captain Wentworth. That she manages to do so fairly easily shows that she thinks more of Anne’s happiness than of being right, though it remains uncertain whether the same was true of her earlier acts of persuasion.
Lady Russell!
 

Jane Austen, Must Reading for Scientists
Jane Austen can serve as a warning to scientists about confirmation bias.
 
Jane Austen Society of North America – Edmonton Chapter

I was surprised to find Jane Austen references in the book, Paws Before Dying, by Susan Conant. It’s a surprisingly good mystery with a very strong dog orientation. JA references often appear in unexpected places, but this is the most unusual book that I’ve found such references in.

 

Jane Austen’s Jewel Box – new stories by Jane Odiwe

austenvariations.com

It’s so exciting to be part of a new blog with its emphasis on writing, and as part of the celebrations I wanted to bring you some new stories. Collectively, I’ve called them Jane Austen’s Jewel Bo…
 
The Watsons get some love!!

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley 
“I have been at school, Emma, and know what a life they lead; you never have.” –Elizabeth #TheWatsons #JaneAusten

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley 
“I would rather do anything than be teacher at a school.” –Emma’s sister Elizabeth, in #TheWatsons #JaneAusten

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley 
“I would rather be teacher at a school (and I can think of nothing worse) than marry a man I did not like.” –Emma, in #TheWatsons #Austen

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley 
“Poverty is a great evil; but to a woman of education and feeling it ought not, it cannot be the greatest.” –Emma #TheWatsons #JaneAusten

 
I’ve posted this wonderful videos from JASNA Jane Austen Society of North America – Eastern Pennsylvania Region several times. They are a gift that keeps on giving. I’ve recently shared them on other sites, so wanted to repost here! Love love love the Twain one and the one about the most twisted of the three twisted English sisters. Also, Elizabeth Bennet Stirs the Pot! They play in a cycle. -Kirk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xO2rFhWfi64&list=UUnJ_nDbs3L_nr6kTtFWJ4FA

 
Jane Austen’s Elizabeth Bennet at the Movies

http://www.youtube.com

Jane Austen’s Elizabeth Bennet: JASNA-Eastern Pennsylvania hopes you’ll learn about the Region’s Jane Austen Day by visiting: http://www.jasnaeastpa.org/jada…
 
 
“I have been charged by the Admiral…that is Admiral Croft has been confidently informed that Mr. Elliot…that everything is now set in your family for a marriage between yourself and Mr. Elliot. It was added that you were to live at Kellynch. The Admiral wished me to say that if this is the case that his lease will be canceled and he and my sister will find themselves another house… What answer should I give the Admiral?” – Captain Wentworth
From http://www.shmoop.com/emma/jane-fairfax.html:

“Jane’s character gets as little of the narrator’s attention as Isabella Knightley does, but this seems to be for different reasons. Isabella doesn’t get much page time because there’s just not that much to say about her. Jane doesn’t get much attention because she wants it that way. After all, with a secret engagement to hide, a pesky narrator (or an inquisitive neighbor) would intrude too much into personal business for Jane’s comfort. Perhaps we don’t learn much about Jane because Emma’s character doesn’t want to know more about Jane’s perfections (and our narrator, as we’ve mentioned, tends to follow Emma’s perspective). But perhaps our narrator is doing Jane a good turn – when the secret engagement comes to light, we learn much more about Jane as a person.

In fact, once her secret’s out, Jane becomes a new woman. She laughs, makes friends with Emma, and seems to dote on Mrs. Weston, her new mother-in-law. We at Shmoop predict that she’ll be very happy as the new Mrs. Churchill…if she can ever get Frank in line.”

Jane Fairfax by Thomas Lawrence

Photo: From http://www.shmoop.com/emma/jane-fairfax.html:

"Jane’s character gets as little of the narrator’s attention as Isabella Knightley does, but this seems to be for different reasons. Isabella doesn’t get much page time because there’s just not that much to say about her. Jane doesn’t get much attention because she wants it that way. After all, with a secret engagement to hide, a pesky narrator (or an inquisitive neighbor) would intrude too much into personal business for Jane’s comfort. Perhaps we don’t learn much about Jane because Emma’s character doesn’t want to know more about Jane’s perfections (and our narrator, as we’ve mentioned, tends to follow Emma’s perspective). But perhaps our narrator is doing Jane a good turn – when the secret engagement comes to light, we learn much more about Jane as a person.

In fact, once her secret’s out, Jane becomes a new woman. She laughs, makes friends with Emma, and seems to dote on Mrs. Weston, her new mother-in-law. We at Shmoop predict that she’ll be very happy as the new Mrs. Churchill…if she can ever get Frank in line."

Jane Fairfax by Thomas Lawrence
 
Sigh! 
Photo: Sigh! <3
Gretna Green is a village in the south of Scotland famous for runaway weddings! A change in the 1700’s meant that practically anybody could conduct a marriage. In Gretna, the blacksmiths of the village took charge, becoming known as “anvil priests”, and still to this day conduct about 5,000 weddings a year! How’s that for a romantic fact  #HappyValentines
Photo: Gretna Green is a village in the south of Scotland famous for runaway weddings! A change in the 1700's meant that practically anybody could conduct a marriage. In Gretna, the blacksmiths of the village took charge, becoming known as "anvil priests", and still to this day conduct about 5,000 weddings a year! How's that for a romantic fact ;) #HappyValentines
 

Mr. Darcy’s Feelings; Or, More on the Inner Life of Jane Austen’s Hero. Volume III, Part 2.
janeausteninvermont.wordpress.com
Hoping you have not all been holding your breath about Mr Darcy’s feelings in Volume 3, but here I am finally to complete this series, and then can be ready to advance to Mansfield Park…
 
Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley Jan 31
“I must move … resting fatigues me.” –Mary Crawford#JaneAusten #FridayFanny #MansfieldPark200

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley Jan 31
“to sit in the shade on a fine day, and look upon verdure, is the most perfect refreshment.” –Fanny Price #FridayFanny #MansfieldPark200

Sarah Emsley @Sarah_Emsley Jan 31
“Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.” –Mary Crawford #JaneAusten #FridayFanny #MansfieldPark200

 
From Austenprose – A Jane Austen Bloghttp://austenprose.com/mansfield-park/mansfield-park-quotes-quips-by-chapter/mansfield-park-quotes-quips-chapters-17-24/

“We have all been more or less to blame,” said he, “every one of us, excepting Fanny. Fanny is the only one who has judged rightly throughout; who has been consistent. Her feelings have been steadily against it from first to last. She never ceased to think of what was due to you (Sir Thomas). You will find Fanny everything you could wish.” Edmund Bertram, Chapter 20

http://www.janeausten.co.uk/in-defense-of-edmund-bertram/

 
She’s back……..

Emma Approved

I’m back and better than ever! Here’s to a new year, new beginnings and a new video: “Should Have Listened” –http://bit.ly/EAep25

Should Have Listened – Emma Approved Ep: 25
Emma’s Look – http://bit.ly/EA_el25 Emma’s Dress – http://bit.ly/EA_d21 Make your life better and.
 

In Which I Find Fault With Jane Austen (gasp!)
thecaptivereader.com
I picked up More Talk of Jane Austen by Sheila Kaye-Smith and G.B. Stern last night, inspired (momentarily) to finally review the essays I’d enjoyed reading so much last year. A thorough review mi…
 
 
Fromhttp://thesecretunderstandingofthehearts.blogspot.com/2010/06/re-reading-persuasion-thoughts-on-anne.html:

“Noted critic, Harold Bloom, seems to have put his finger upon it when he described Anne Elliot as having a “Shakespearean inwardness” . Like Shakespeare’s most intensely inward character, Hamlet, she experiences a spiritual isolation and withdrawal from the dysfunctional world around her, she displays extreme introspection and psychological perspicacity and she possesses the strength of will to remain true to her character and values, despite changes in circumstance.”

Anne Elliot in bloom by Thomas Lawrence!

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Responses

  1. Enjoyed thes snippets, Kirk!


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