Posted by: rearadmiral | February 15, 2014

14th of Feb and other love stories!

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Move over Mr Darcy and Elizabeth –Mr Peacock and Miss Peahen are our favourite lovebirds  

Happy Valentine’s Day! — with Timothy John McManusand Nancy McManus.

Photo: Move over Mr Darcy and Elizabeth –Mr Peacock and Miss Peahen are our favourite lovebirds :) 

Happy Valentine’s Day!
 
“There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison”

― Jane Austen, Persuasion

 
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Top 20 love stories. Interesting list!
Love stories
 
Persuasion, Mansfield Park, and Northanger together. Comments? Favorites?
Photo: Persuasion, Mansfield Park, and Northanger together. Comments? Favorites?
 
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And the most important Bday of today(J/K)…..George Meredith!!!!! The perfect marriage of words and sound! George Meredith lived(and passed) on Box Hill. Yes, that Box Hill!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCFVl4KYd4Q

The Lark Ascending: George Meredith & Ralph Vaughan Williams
The Lark Ascending by Ralph Vaughan Williams accompanied by…
 
From http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/john-dashwood.html:

John Dashwood

Character Analysis
We can’t help but feel a little bad for John. On one hand, he’s not exactly a good guy; after all, he basically leaves his sisters and stepmother penniless after their father dies. On the other hand, though, he didn’t want to do it, and he later feels guilty about it – his wife Fanny pressured him into keeping all of the inheritance money. Of course, his wife’s not entirely to blame, since he’s just as greedy and smarmy as she is (he practically salivates over the idea of being related to rich and dignified Colonel Brandon).

However, John isn’t completely bad at heart; he does seem to have some genuine affection for his sisters, since he’s always happy to see them, and in his own way, he wants to make sure they end up OK. He’s constantly asking Fanny if Elinor and Marianne can come and visit, or if he can give them little gifts of money to help them out, only to get shot down by his conscience-free, heartless wife. Because John is still a Dashwood, he’s not all bad, but because he’s under the influence of the Ferrars, he’s not all good, either.

 
 

Twitter / CEOHTL: Our restoration of 116 High …
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The director calls Lady Susan “brilliant”???????? I think I don’t need to see this little nightmare! -Kirk

“Stillman told Screen: “The other two early novels Jane Austen wrote became Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility ­ the story of the brilliant Lady Susan Vernon’s struggles with the wealthy, smug De Courcy clan is perhaps her most sparkling comedy.”

Margaret C. Sullivan shared a link.

Sienna Miller has been cast as Lady Susan Vernon in Whit Stillman’s upcoming film, Jane Austen’s Love and Friendship. Sounds like a new kind of Jane Austen mashup!

Casting News for Love and Friendship Movie
austenblog.com

http://austenblog.com/2014/02/09/casting-news-for-love-and-friendship-movie/

 

The Adventures of Jane and Thorin, Part the Second
austenblog.com
Thorin: Miss Austen! Jane: Yes, your majesty? Thorin: Perhaps it has escaped your notice, madam, but you are at present under threat of a troll attack. Troll: HELLO! I AM TROLL! Jane: Oh…yes, I s…
 
Pride, Prejudice, and Cheese Grits

WHOOHOOO!!! New giveaway starts today! Check out the Darcy mug…http://virginiacarmichael.blogspot.com/2014/02/winner-of-bingleys-tea-and-chance-to.html?showComment=1391903885997#c7024344822132050161

The Things That Last: Winner of the Bingley’s Tea!!! And the chance to win a Darcy Proposal Mug
virginiacarmichael.blogspot.com

 
The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
Too soon did she find herself at the drawing-room door; and after pausing a moment for what she knew would not come, for a courage which the outside of no door had ever supplied to her, she turned the lock in desperation, and the lights of the drawing-room, and all the collected family, were before her. As she entered, her own name caught her ear. Sir Thomas was at that moment looking round him, and saying, “But where is Fanny? Why do not I see my little Fanny?”–and on perceiving her, came forward with a kindness which astonished and penetrated her, calling her his dear Fanny, kissing her affectionately, and observing with decided pleasure how much she was grown! Fanny knew not how to feel, nor where to look. She was quite oppressed. He had never been so kind, so very kind to her in his life. His manner seemed changed, his voice was quick from the agitation of joy; and all that had been awful in his dignity seemed lost in tenderness.
 
Pride, Prejudice, and Cheese Grits

WHOOHOOO!!! New giveaway starts today! Check out the Darcy mug…http://virginiacarmichael.blogspot.com/2014/02/winner-of-bingleys-tea-and-chance-to.html?showComment=1391903885997#c7024344822132050161

 
From Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen: Jane Austen and The Men in Her Life and Novels”:

“Charlotte must have missed the point of the great many profound truths in Jane’s quiet irony; her own idea of a desirable profundity and a correct level of vehement ruffling is to distress her readers at the end of what promise to be wholly delightful novels with grisly surprises”!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! pg 184

 
4.25 regency teacups to “Pride, Prejudice, and Cheese Grits” by Mary Jane Hathaway

I received a free ebook as the 88th of the first 100 people to respond to the offer. I had finished the next book in the series, “Emma, Mr. Knightley, and Chili-Dogs” a few weeks before and loved it. I love this one as much as the first one. The Elizabeth/Darcy is well handled and very funny. I love that they are both Civil War historians. The Jane Bennet character is an Austen scholar!!! I love love love that the fact that the heroine of “Emma…..” appears in this book, in a brief but most delightful role. For my taste, that was perhaps abit too much religion. Both “Emma…” and this one are being revised and should be out in the Spring/Summer. When I emailed the author for my ebook, she mentioned there’s a new book coming out at some point. Yea!!!! Finally, I love that there’s a Cheese Grits and also a Pecan Pie recipe at the end of the book…..off to the Kitchen!

Photo: 4.25 regency teacups to "Pride, Prejudice, and Cheese Grits" by Mary Jane Hathaway

I received a free ebook as the 88th of the first 100 people to respond to the offer. I had finished the next book in the series, "Emma, Mr. Knightley, and Chili-Dogs" a few weeks before and loved it. I love this one as much as the first one. The Elizabeth/Darcy is well handled and very funny. I love that they are both Civil War historians. The Jane Bennet character is an Austen scholar!!! I love love love that the fact that the heroine of "Emma....." appears in this book, in a brief but most delightful role. For my taste, that was perhaps abit too much religion. Both "Emma..." and this one are being revised and should be out in the Spring/Summer. When I emailed the author for my ebook, she mentioned there's a new book coming out at some point. Yea!!!! Finally, I love that there's a Cheese Grits and also a Pecan Pie recipe at the end of the book.....off to the Kitchen!
 
As a card carrying member of Team Marianne, I strongly disagree with the S&S comments!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! However, I do agree with the Age of Innocence comments! Anyone else? -Kirk

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/07/romance-book_n_4731269.html?&ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000031

10 Book Romances We Wish Had Ended Differently
J.K. Rowling recently announced that she made a mistake with the way she chose to wrap up the Harry Potter saga. “For reasons that have very little to do with literature,” she initially paired Ron with Hermione, and in the final book, she w…
 
And the most important post of the day…..Happy Bday Ciaran Hinds!!!
Photo: And the most important post of the day.....Happy Bday Ciaran Hinds!!!
 
“Her way of thinking and writing is moderate and tolerant. It is much closer is spirit to the best precepts of the late twentieth century than to the Victorians following her who stifled themselves under the weight of their own heavy moralizing but whose fictional flow, by contrast, tended to regress to Gothic melodrama as ludicrous in Jane’s eyes as in ours” (From Kirk: This means you Chuckie and all three Twisted English Sisters!!!!!!) – Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen: Jane Austen and The Men in Her Life and Novels”, Introduction
 
4.25 regency Teacups to “Jane and Her Gentlemen:Jane Austen and The Men in Her Life and Novels” by Audrey Hawkridge

“Her way of thinking and writing is moderate and tolerant. It is much closer is spirit to the best precepts of the late twentieth century than to the Victorians following her who stifled themselves under the weight of their own heavy moralizing but whose fictional flow, by contrast, tended to regress to Gothic melodrama as ludicrous in Jane’s eyes as in ours” (From Kirk: This means you Chuckie and all three Twisted English Sisters!!!!!!) – Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen: Jane Austen and The Men in Her Life and Novels”, Introduction

“Charlotte must have missed the point of the great many profound truths in Jane’s quiet irony; her own idea of a desirable profundity and a correct level of vehement ruffling is to distress her readers at the end of what promise to be wholly delightful novels with grisly surprises”!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! pg 184

Here’s a great review of the book from a past JASNA President:
BOOK REVIEWS
Edited by George Justice
A Single Woman in Possession of Herself

Jane and Her Gentlemen

By Audrey Hawkridge.
Peter Owen Ltd./Dufour Editions, 2001. 208 pages. 24 b/w illustrations.
Hardcover. $37.95.

Reviewed by Marsha Huff.

Turning a spotlight on a single subject can sometimes provide more dramatic insight than is achieved by crowding the stage with a full cast. In Jane and Her Gentlemen, Audrey Hawkridge focuses on the men in Austen’s life and novels, from her father and brothers to suitors and would-be husbands, with amusing glances at her fictional heroes and anti-heroes as well. While the biographical information in the book is familiar, the author’s new angle provides a useful perspective on the crowd of data found in a traditional biography.

The nature of Austen’s relationship with the men who figured in her life is illuminated primarily through references to her own correspondence, giving a vivid, first-hand touch to the portraits. The author quotes, for example, a letter to Cassandra, written in 1811 from London, in which Austen describes her brother Henry as he stopped at the house of a cousin to collect her. He puts “Life & Wit into the party for a quarter of an hour.” This brief account conveys the pleasure Austen derived from Henry’s company and demonstrates, more persuasively than any commentary could, one of the traits that made him her favorite brother.

For the book’s epigraph Hawkridge cites a remark by Austen recorded by her nephew James Edward Austen-Leigh: “I am too proud of my gentlemen to admit that they are only Mr A or Colonel B.” In the spirit of Austen’s words, Hawkridge eschews simplistic equations, while at the same time providing sufficient information to lead the reader inevitably to parallels between family members and fictional heroes. “It can be no coincidence,” she notes, that each of Austen’s heroines marries a landed gentleman, a clergyman, or an officer in His Majesty’s armed forces. One of Austen’s brothers, Edward, was (like Frank Churchill) adopted by wealthy relatives and became a landed gentleman; her father and two of her brothers–James and, later, Henry–were members of the clergy; and the youngest brothers, Francis and Charles, were officers in the British Royal Navy.

In the course of presenting miniatures of Austen’s gentlemen, Hawkridge finds a number of suggestive similarities between the real and the imaginary. Mary Crawford’s aversion to the idea of marriage to a clergyman is compared, for instance, to the refusal by the Austens’ elegant cousin Eliza de Feuillide of James Austen’s proposal because, the author says, Eliza had a dread of sinking into quiet obscurity as a parson’s wife. Eliza’s marriage a few years later to Henry Austen was a different matter, since, at that period of his life, Henry was a dashing red-coat in the militia, sophisticated and eager to enter London society with Eliza.

The final section of the book explores Austen’s own romances, including her relationship at the age of 20 with a visitor from Ireland, Tom Lefroy. Their flirtation appeared to represent the beginning of a real attachment. The Lefroy family saw danger for the young man, who, though poor, was thought to have a brilliant legal career ahead of him. Had Austen been wealthy, it would have been a match worth promoting, but she was not. Tom’s family abruptly cut short his visit to Hampshire, removing him from temptation. Hawkridge aptly comments: “When Jane is condemned for over-emphasizing the importance of money in marriage, it is perhaps forgotten that she had every reason to be uncomfortably aware of this importance as a basic fact of life, having been an early victim of it herself.”

Hawkridge adopts a distinctly romantic point of view concerning another of Austen’s thwarted romances, a purported encounter with a “mystery lover.” According to various memoirs published long after Austen’s death, all attributed to oral accounts by Cassandra, Austen met and fell in love with an unnamed gentleman at a seaside resort, possibly during the years she lived in Bath. His sudden death soon afterward, and the absence of any reference to the events in contemporaneous reports, leave a gap that concerns some biographers. Claire Tomalin, for example, devotes only a paragraph to the subject, concluding that the accounts “had become as mistily romantic as the wilder shores of Devon itself.” Hawkridge’s personal assessment of the story, however, makes good reading. Her conjecture regarding a possible connection between the Rice portrait (whose authenticity as a picture of Austen has been rejected by most experts) and another would-be suitor is also interesting.

Austen’s one documented marriage proposal was from Harris Bigg-Wither, a long-time family friend who was heir to a large estate. After accepting the proposal on the evening of December 2, 1802, Austen retracted the next morning. Hawkridge concludes, “Jane refused to do what nine out of ten women in her position would have unhesitatingly done and marry for security rather than love. She preferred to be mistress of her own thoughts and actions and was content with her own company.”

Marsha Huff is an attorney in Milwaukee. She is Regional Coordinator of the Wisconsin Region and a member of the Board of Directors of JASNA.

JASNA News v.17, no. 2, Summer 2001, p. 29

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