Posted by: rearadmiral | February 23, 2014

Happy Bday Prudie and Col Brandon!!!!

“As Catherine Morland rightly protests-‘The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences on every page; the men all so good-for-nothing and hardly any women at all-it is very tiresome.’ Jane Austen ignores the more tiresome aspects of history, but her books are full of its more charming implications, for in them we see men and women of a different age come alive with all their equipment of human interests, human moods, human fashions and ideas and movements, literary, artistic, and cultural….None of this would have stood out so clearly against a background of wars and pestilences”. -Sheila Kaye-Smith and G.B. Stern “Speaking of Jane Austen” pg24
Photo: "As Catherine Morland rightly protests-'The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences on every page; the men all so good-for-nothing and hardly any women at all-it is very tiresome.' Jane Austen ignores the more tiresome aspects of history, but her books are full of its more charming implications, for in them we see men and women of a different age come alive with all their equipment of human interests, human moods, human fashions and ideas and movements, literary, artistic, and cultural....None of this would have stood out so clearly against a background of wars and pestilences". -Sheila Kaye-Smith and G.B. Stern "Speaking of Jane Austen" pg24
Happy Bday and congrats to new mom Prudie aka Emily Blunt!!! I also loved her in Salmon Fishing in the Yemen(thank you @Mary Josephine Crawley for recommending that lovely film!
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Emma group read at indiejane.org!!!
“Whom are you going to dance with?’ asked Mr. Knightley.She hesitated a moment and then replied, ‘With you, if you will ask me.’

Will you?’ said he, offering his hand.

Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance, and you know we are not really so much brother and sister as to make it at all improper.’

Brother and sister! no, indeed.”

Photo: “Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley.</p>
<p>She hesitated a moment and then replied, 'With you, if you will ask me.'</p>
<p>Will you?' said he, offering his hand.</p>
<p>Indeed I will. You have shown that you can dance, and you know we are not really so much brother and sister as to make it at all improper.'</p>
<p>Brother and sister! no, indeed.”
Warm welcomes to Lisa and Carole!!!!!http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/lucy-steele.html

Lucy Steele

Character Analysis
That Lucy Steele is certainly a tricky one. She’s clever, manipulative, and self-serving – basically, everything you need to be to climb the social ladder to material success in Austen’s world. Her success, however, comes at the expense of her own character. Though Lucy is pretty and outwardly sweet, she’s no Dashwood; compared to genuinely good-hearted Elinor or Marianne, Lucy comes off as cold, sneaky, and more than a little mean in comparison. Her treachery is made all the worse by the fact that she looks so nice and kind on the outside – so much so that she basically tricks all the other characters into liking her. Her deeds, however, are pretty despicable. Through the course of the novel, she manages to break poor Elinor’s heart, plague Edward’s life for a number of years, then dump him for his own brother in the pursuit of financial fortune and social standing. In other words, she’s a low down, dirty deceiver, and we don’t like her one bit.

More Happy Bday Alan Rickman!!!!http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/colonel-brandon.html

Colonel Brandon

Character Analysis
Ever heard the expression, “Still waters run deep”? That’s basically how we feel about Colonel Brandon. On the outside, he’s a quiet guy – at 35, he’s a bachelor approaching middle age, and he doesn’t seem to have any family to speak of. He’s dignified and well-to-do, but beyond that, we don’t get much from first impressions. The Colonel appears to be rather dull to the insensitive eye, but beneath his tranquil surface, there’s a whole lot going on. Elinor is the first to appreciate this, but gradually, other characters (including, finally, Marianne, when she decides to marry him) realize that he’s a whole lot more than meets the eye.

First of all, Colonel Brandon is clearly a sensitive soul, even though his exterior seems unflappable and even rather remote. He’s the only person who appreciates Marianne’s music the same way she does – respectfully and thoughtfully – and we get the impression that his quiet persona hides a deeply intellectual inner self. Colonel Brandon is also by far the character with the most significant emotional trauma to deal with, which he manages to do in an admirably mature, applause-worthy fashion. He’s the ultimate combination of feeling and logic, and comes off as the only real grownup in this whole cast of characters.

All in all, Colonel Brandon may seem to be on the boring side, but he’s actually not – he’s just more under control than the other folks we meet here. We don’t get to know him too well, but we can imagine that he’s a pretty rewarding friend to have, once you get past his rather stiff exterior.

Photo: More Happy Bday Alan Rickman!!!!</p>
<p>http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/colonel-brandon.html</p>
<p>Colonel Brandon</p>
<p>Character Analysis<br />
Ever heard the expression, "Still waters run deep"? That's basically how we feel about Colonel Brandon. On the outside, he's a quiet guy – at 35, he's a bachelor approaching middle age, and he doesn't seem to have any family to speak of. He's dignified and well-to-do, but beyond that, we don't get much from first impressions. The Colonel appears to be rather dull to the insensitive eye, but beneath his tranquil surface, there's a whole lot going on. Elinor is the first to appreciate this, but gradually, other characters (including, finally, Marianne, when she decides to marry him) realize that he's a whole lot more than meets the eye.</p>
<p>First of all, Colonel Brandon is clearly a sensitive soul, even though his exterior seems unflappable and even rather remote. He's the only person who appreciates Marianne's music the same way she does – respectfully and thoughtfully – and we get the impression that his quiet persona hides a deeply intellectual inner self. Colonel Brandon is also by far the character with the most significant emotional trauma to deal with, which he manages to do in an admirably mature, applause-worthy fashion. He's the ultimate combination of feeling and logic, and comes off as the only real grownup in this whole cast of characters.</p>
<p>All in all, Colonel Brandon may seem to be on the boring side, but he's actually not – he's just more under control than the other folks we meet here. We don't get to know him too well, but we can imagine that he's a pretty rewarding friend to have, once you get past his rather stiff exterior.
Happy Bday Anthony Head(Sir Walter Elliot Persuasion 2007), Brenda Blethyn(Mrs Bennet P&P 2005), and Imogen Stubbs(Lucy Steele S&S 1995)!!!!
Mansfield Park Quote of the Day:
“Nobody meant to be unkind,but nobody put themselves out of their way to secure her comfort.”
Deborah Barnum
Jane Austen on the weather: “I have often observed that if one writes about the Weather, it is generally completely changed before the Letter is read. I wish it may prove so now…” [Ltr. 142]
Sir Walter Elliot and Mirrors!”Mirror, Mirrors(and Mirrors, and Mirrors) and Mirrors*Pie(Boston cream please) RRRRR Squared on the walls….I’m the fairest of them all”!

From http://www.shmoop.com/persuasion/sir-walter-elliot.html

Sir Walter Elliot

Character Analysis
In the Seven Deadly Sins Olympics, Sir Walter would take a gold medal in vanity. (Distant runner-up: Vanity Smurf.) He’s so vain, he probably thinks this novel’s about him.

Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot’s character; vanity of person and of situation. […] He considered the blessing of beauty as inferior only to the blessing of a baronetcy; and the Sir Walter Elliot, who united these gifts, was the constant object of his warmest respect and devotion. (1.6)

Sir Walter is vain about two things: his appearance and his title. The above passage, by referring to those two qualities as “blessings” and “gifts,” points out one important aspect they have in common: both were given to him by his parents, rather than being rewards for his own hard work. Sir Walter was, in short, very lucky (making him oddly similar to the likewise “lucky” (4.4) Captain Wentworth, though their luck takes different forms). His self-respect, the above quotation makes clear, is not based on anything he’s accomplished in his life, but rather is something he was born into.

While being forced out of Kellynch could have been the blow that woke Sir Walter up to the possibility of making something of himself, instead he simply reshapes his vanity to fit the new setting of Bath. Anne is disappointed that her father’s vanity does not appear even dented by his reduction in situation.

She might not wonder, but she must sigh that her father should feel no degradation in his change, should see nothing to regret in the duties and dignity of the resident landholder, should find so much to be vain of in the littlenesses of a town[.] (15.5)

Sir Walter’s vanity is so well-anchored that even uprooting him from the grand surroundings of Kellynch Hall and depositing him in the smaller-scale luxury of a Bath townhouse doesn’t budge it. By contrasting “vain” with “littlenesses,” the passage suggests another meaning of vanity: pointlessness. Sir Walter’s obsession with his rank could have meaning in the country where, as the “resident landholder,” he has “duties and dignity” to give purpose to his position (for more on this, see the section on Kellynch Hall in “Symbols, Imagery, Allegory”). In Bath, however, where his only “duties” are to show off at the right places and make friends with the right people, his vanity seems (to Anne, at least) even more pointless than it did in the country.

In the end, however, Sir Walter’s vanity does Anne a solid in that it fuels his eventual acquiescence to her marriage to Wentworth.

When he saw more of Captain Wentworth, saw him repeatedly by daylight, and eyed him well, he was very much struck by his personal claims, and felt that his superiority of appearance might be not unfairly balanced against her superiority of rank; and all this, assisted by his well-sounding name, enabled Sir Walter at last to prepare his pen, with a very good grace, for the insertion of the marriage in the volume of honour. (24.2)

We might think Sir Walter approves of Wentworth for all the wrong reasons, but at least he does manage to see something to approve of in his new son-in-law. Is this the first step in the long-delayed education of Sir Walter? Or is he the same poster child for vanity he always was? Whichever way he may go in future, at the end of the novel Sir Walter’s still leaving poor old Vanity Smurf in the dust.

Photo: Sir Walter Elliot and Mirrors!</p>
<p>"Mirror, Mirrors(and Mirrors, and Mirrors) and Mirrors*Pie(Boston cream please) RRRRR Squared on the walls....I'm the fairest of them all"!</p>
<p>From http://www.shmoop.com/persuasion/sir-walter-elliot.html</p>
<p>Sir Walter Elliot</p>
<p>Character Analysis<br />
In the Seven Deadly Sins Olympics, Sir Walter would take a gold medal in vanity. (Distant runner-up: Vanity Smurf.) He’s so vain, he probably thinks this novel’s about him.</p>
<p>Vanity was the beginning and the end of Sir Walter Elliot's character; vanity of person and of situation. […] He considered the blessing of beauty as inferior only to the blessing of a baronetcy; and the Sir Walter Elliot, who united these gifts, was the constant object of his warmest respect and devotion. (1.6)</p>
<p>Sir Walter is vain about two things: his appearance and his title. The above passage, by referring to those two qualities as "blessings" and "gifts," points out one important aspect they have in common: both were given to him by his parents, rather than being rewards for his own hard work. Sir Walter was, in short, very lucky (making him oddly similar to the likewise "lucky" (4.4) Captain Wentworth, though their luck takes different forms). His self-respect, the above quotation makes clear, is not based on anything he’s accomplished in his life, but rather is something he was born into.</p>
<p>While being forced out of Kellynch could have been the blow that woke Sir Walter up to the possibility of making something of himself, instead he simply reshapes his vanity to fit the new setting of Bath. Anne is disappointed that her father’s vanity does not appear even dented by his reduction in situation.</p>
<p>She might not wonder, but she must sigh that her father should feel no degradation in his change, should see nothing to regret in the duties and dignity of the resident landholder, should find so much to be vain of in the littlenesses of a town[.] (15.5)</p>
<p>Sir Walter’s vanity is so well-anchored that even uprooting him from the grand surroundings of Kellynch Hall and depositing him in the smaller-scale luxury of a Bath townhouse doesn’t budge it. By contrasting "vain" with "littlenesses," the passage suggests another meaning of vanity: pointlessness. Sir Walter’s obsession with his rank could have meaning in the country where, as the "resident landholder," he has "duties and dignity" to give purpose to his position (for more on this, see the section on Kellynch Hall in "Symbols, Imagery, Allegory"). In Bath, however, where his only "duties" are to show off at the right places and make friends with the right people, his vanity seems (to Anne, at least) even more pointless than it did in the country.</p>
<p>In the end, however, Sir Walter’s vanity does Anne a solid in that it fuels his eventual acquiescence to her marriage to Wentworth.</p>
<p>When he saw more of Captain Wentworth, saw him repeatedly by daylight, and eyed him well, he was very much struck by his personal claims, and felt that his superiority of appearance might be not unfairly balanced against her superiority of rank; and all this, assisted by his well-sounding name, enabled Sir Walter at last to prepare his pen, with a very good grace, for the insertion of the marriage in the volume of honour. (24.2)</p>
<p>We might think Sir Walter approves of Wentworth for all the wrong reasons, but at least he does manage to see something to approve of in his new son-in-law. Is this the first step in the long-delayed education of Sir Walter? Or is he the same poster child for vanity he always was? Whichever way he may go in future, at the end of the novel Sir Walter’s still leaving poor old Vanity Smurf in the dust.
The strawberry picnic in Emma gets a mention in the March issue of Saveur. -Shirley
Photo: The strawberry picnic in Emma gets a mention in the March issue of Saveur. -Shirley
The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
It was a busy morning with him. Conversation with any of them occupied but a small part of it. He had to reinstate himself in all the wonted concerns of his Mansfield life: to see his steward and his bailiff; to examine and compute, and, in the intervals of business, to walk into his stables and his gardens, and nearest plantations; but active and methodical, he had not only done all this before he resumed his seat as master of the house at dinner, he had also set the carpenter to work in pulling down what had been so lately put up in the billiard-room, and given the scene-painter his dismissal long enough to justify the pleasing belief of his being then at least as far off as Northampton. The scene-painter was gone, having spoilt only the floor of one room, ruined all the coachman’s sponges, and made five of the under-servants idle and dissatisfied; and Sir Thomas was in hopes that another day or two would suffice to wipe away every outward memento of what had been, even to the destruction of every unbound copy of Lovers’ Vows in the house, for he was burning all that met his eye.
Photo: The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:<br />
It was a busy morning with him. Conversation with any of them occupied but a small part of it. He had to reinstate himself in all the wonted concerns of his Mansfield life: to see his steward and his bailiff; to examine and compute, and, in the intervals of business, to walk into his stables and his gardens, and nearest plantations; but active and methodical, he had not only done all this before he resumed his seat as master of the house at dinner, he had also set the carpenter to work in pulling down what had been so lately put up in the billiard-room, and given the scene-painter his dismissal long enough to justify the pleasing belief of his being then at least as far off as Northampton. The scene-painter was gone, having spoilt only the floor of one room, ruined all the coachman's sponges, and made five of the under-servants idle and dissatisfied; and Sir Thomas was in hopes that another day or two would suffice to wipe away every outward memento of what had been, even to the destruction of every unbound copy of Lovers' Vows in the house, for he was burning all that met his eye.
From http://www.shmoop.com/pride-and-prejudice/georgiana-darcy.htmlGeorgiana Darcy

Character Analysis
Georgiana is Mr. Darcy’s painfully shy and sweetly malleable sister. Wickham calls her “proud,” but Lizzy figures out pretty quickly that she was only “exceedingly shy” (44.3), so it makes sense that Wickham was able to fool the girl into thinking she was in love with him. Aside from that lapse in judgment—which is totally forgivable—she seems like a nice girl:

Miss Darcy was tall, and on a larger scale than Elizabeth; and, though little more than sixteen, her figure was formed, and her appearance womanly and graceful. She was less handsome than her brother; but there was sense and good humour in her face, and her manners were perfectly unassuming and gentle. (44.4)

In other words, Georgiana is a lot more like Jane than she is like Elizabeth. (Oh, and BTW, descriptions like “her figure was formed” and “womanly” are early nineteenth century code for “bosomy.” Why do you think Austen throws that in?)

About ten years younger than Darcy (more like eleven, if we accept Darcy’s implication that he’s 28 in chapter 58, paragraph 54), she looks up to her older brother with a “respect which almost overcame her affection” (61.15). Imagine her surprise when she sees Lizzy actually teasing the guy: “at first she often listened with an astonishment bordering on alarm at her lively, sportive manner of talking to her brother” (61.15). In the end, though, Lizzy is a good influence on the girl—and our fingers are crossed that she’ll make a good marriage of her own someday.

Georgiana Darcy at Ramsgate?

Photo: From http://www.shmoop.com/pride-and-prejudice/georgiana-darcy.html</p>
<p>Georgiana Darcy</p>
<p>Character Analysis<br />
Georgiana is Mr. Darcy's painfully shy and sweetly malleable sister. Wickham calls her "proud," but Lizzy figures out pretty quickly that she was only "exceedingly shy" (44.3), so it makes sense that Wickham was able to fool the girl into thinking she was in love with him. Aside from that lapse in judgment—which is totally forgivable—she seems like a nice girl:</p>
<p>Miss Darcy was tall, and on a larger scale than Elizabeth; and, though little more than sixteen, her figure was formed, and her appearance womanly and graceful. She was less handsome than her brother; but there was sense and good humour in her face, and her manners were perfectly unassuming and gentle. (44.4)</p>
<p>In other words, Georgiana is a lot more like Jane than she is like Elizabeth. (Oh, and BTW, descriptions like "her figure was formed" and "womanly" are early nineteenth century code for "bosomy." Why do you think Austen throws that in?)</p>
<p>About ten years younger than Darcy (more like eleven, if we accept Darcy's implication that he's 28 in chapter 58, paragraph 54), she looks up to her older brother with a "respect which almost overcame her affection" (61.15). Imagine her surprise when she sees Lizzy actually teasing the guy: "at first she often listened with an astonishment bordering on alarm at her lively, sportive manner of talking to her brother" (61.15). In the end, though, Lizzy is a good influence on the girl—and our fingers are crossed that she'll make a good marriage of her own someday.</p>
<p>Georgiana Darcy at Ramsgate?

Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries

sites.duke.edu

What if Mary and Anne had iPhones? Here is a re-imagining of a scene from Chapter 5 of Persuasion viewed as a modern texting convo from Anne Elliott’s point of view.

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