Posted by: rearadmiral | March 1, 2014

Please make haste to BBC4

P&P part one, with great Amanda Root(Persuasion 95( as the narrator)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03vzvmc

Episode 1

Pride and Prejudice Episode 1 of 3

AVAILABILITY:
17 HOURS LEFT TO LISTEN
Duration: 
58 minutes
First broadcast:

 Sunday 23 February 2014

by Jane Austen
Dramatised by Charlotte Jones

Mrs Bennet is determined to get her five daughters married off and secure a future for them all.
And when Mr Bingley a wealthy man arrives in the neighbourhood she wastes no time in making his acquaintance.

Director ….. Sally Avens

Published just over 200 years ago Pride and Prejudice remains one of the Nation’s favourite novels; with its intellect and wit it appeals to a broad range of readers. It stands the test of time by dealing with the timeless issues of love, social class, money and mistaken judgements and by having a witty and clever though flawed heroine at its heart. Elizabeth Bennet is a thorough radical for her time and perhaps the first heroine to ask is it possible to have it all?

Pippa Nixon takes on the role of Elizabeth; she received rave reviews for her Rosalind in ‘As You Like It’ ‘ a rising young star’ and starred as Ophelia opposite David Tennant.
Jamie Parker (Darcy) has played Henry V at the National and is shortly to portray Hamlet on Radio 4.
Double Olivier Award winner Samantha Spiro takes on Mrs Bennet and Toby Jones Mr Collins. SHOW LESS

Also:

Episode 1

AVAILABILITY:
2 DAYS LEFT TO LISTEN
Duration: 
15 minutes
First broadcast:

 

Monday 24 February 2014

Twenty-six years have passed since the death of Jane Austen. Armed with a lock of Austen’s hair as perhaps her best clue, Anne Sharp, former governess to the Austen family and Jane’s close friend, has decided at least to tell her story-a story of family intrigues, shocking secrets, forbidden loves, and maybe even murder.

Upon its publication in the UK, Lindsay Ashford’s fictional…  SHOW MORE

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03w0116

 

“Character cameos, in more novels than one could list, have been created very successfully from servants, yet this is one category of people of whom, in her works, Jane hardly seemed aware. She never gave them more than a line or two to speak; but this was not because they failed to exist for her but because she wrote only on subjects she knew about”.

-Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen:Jane Austen and the Men in Her Life and Novels” pg109

Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
“But Jane lets many of her less pleasant characters off lightly, especially if they have afforded her readers amusement. So Sir Walter preens his way through the novel, untouched from beginning to end by anything worse than having to let his house to provide ready cash – unless his haughty eldest daughter’s lack of a desirable match for him to enter into his family Bible can be counted as sufficiently onerous punishment”. -Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen:Jane Austen and the Men in Her Life and Novels” pg118
Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/persuasion/themes.html

Separate Spheres

The idea of separate spheres was a nineteenth-century doctrine that there are two domains of life: the public and the domestic. Traditionally, the male would be in charge of the public domain (finances, legal matters, etc.) while the female would be in charge of the private domain (running the house, ordering the servants, etc.). This novel questions the idea of separate spheres by introducing the Crofts. Presented as an example of a happy, ideal marriage, Admiral and Mrs. Croft share the spheres of their life. Mrs. Croft joins her husband on his ships at sea, and Admiral Croft is happy to help his wife in the chores around the home. They have such a partnership that they even share the task of driving a carriage. Austen, in this novel, challenges the prevailing notion of separate spheres.

The Changing Ideal of the Gentleman

This novel presents two very different versions of the English gentleman. On one hand is Sir Walter, the traditional, land-owning, titled man who avoids work and seeks comfort. On the other hand are Captain Wentworth and Admiral Croft. Both naval officers are working men who have made their own fortunes. Though their manners are impeccable, they are not of the same high social rank as Sir Walter. In this period of English history, the definition of a ‘gentleman’ was growing increasingly more flexible; this novel reflects that change.

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/persuasion/themes.html

Separate Spheres

The idea of separate spheres was a nineteenth-century doctrine that there are two domains of life: the public and the domestic. Traditionally, the male would be in charge of the public domain (finances, legal matters, etc.) while the female would be in charge of the private domain (running the house, ordering the servants, etc.). This novel questions the idea of separate spheres by introducing the Crofts. Presented as an example of a happy, ideal marriage, Admiral and Mrs. Croft share the spheres of their life. Mrs. Croft joins her husband on his ships at sea, and Admiral Croft is happy to help his wife in the chores around the home. They have such a partnership that they even share the task of driving a carriage. Austen, in this novel, challenges the prevailing notion of separate spheres.

The Changing Ideal of the Gentleman

This novel presents two very different versions of the English gentleman. On one hand is Sir Walter, the traditional, land-owning, titled man who avoids work and seeks comfort. On the other hand are Captain Wentworth and Admiral Croft. Both naval officers are working men who have made their own fortunes. Though their manners are impeccable, they are not of the same high social rank as Sir Walter. In this period of English history, the definition of a 'gentleman' was growing increasingly more flexible; this novel reflects that change.
The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

How wonderful, how very wonderful the operations of time, and the changes of the human mind!”

“In just such a way does Emma Woodhouse’s sister Isabella make herself happy with John Knightley, whose ‘temper was not his great perfection’, and a less subtle manner, Charlotte Palmer of Sense and Sensibility, with her ‘droll’ husband whose every excess of rudeness merely draws from her more peals of laughter and wifely admiration. Jane observed some strange partnerships in her social round, and mused on them to good effect”.- Audrey Hawkridge “Jane and her Gentlemen:Jane Austen and the Men in Her Life and Novels” pg109
Photo
Photo
The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:
The evergreen! How beautiful, how welcome, how wonderful the evergreen! When one thinks of it, how astonishing a variety of nature! In some countries we know the tree that sheds its leaf is the variety, but that does not make it less amazing that the same soil and the same sun should nurture plants differing in the first rule and law of their existence. You will think me rhapsodising; but when I am out of doors, especially when I am sitting out of doors, I am very apt to get into this sort of wondering strain. One cannot fix one’s eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.”
Abigail Adams Historical Society
Our upcoming Program Calendar! Stay tuned for details:

Sunday, April 27, Colonial Dessert Tea Party with Mrs. Adams
Sunday, May 18, Author Diane Jacobs speaks on Abigail & Sisters
Friday, June 6, Local author reception TBA
October 24-25, 250th Anniversary Celebration of John and Abigail Wedding, with a weekend of events including a wedding reenactment, symposium, celebrity keynote speaker, and reception

“All this she must possess,” added Darcy, “and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.”

Jane Austen – Pride & Prejudice

Photo: "All this she must possess," added Darcy, "and to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading."

Jane Austen - Pride & Prejudice
  • Photo
    Gorgeous Jane Austen Novel Illustrations From the Time Before Adaptations:http://flavorwire.com/431809/gorgeous-jane-austen-novel-illustrations-from-the-time-before-adaptations — at The British Library.
     Helen Draper
    LIFELONG LEARNING LECTURE SERIES
    This free 10-lecture series series is a collaboration of
    Framingham State University and Framingham Public Library.
    All lectures take place on Thursday evenings at Framingham
    Public Library, Costin Room, 49 Lexington Street.
    No registration required. Refreshments.

    Jane Austen: Creating a World that Captures our
    Imagination. Guest Speaker: Dr. Cheryl Nixon,
    English Dept. Chair & Associate Professor of English,
    UMASS – Boston. Thursday, March 6, 7:00pm.

    This presentation examines the imaginative power of Jane
    Austen’s writing and how her novels capture her world –
    small town life in 18th century England
    This presentation examines the imaginative power of Jane
    Austen’s writing and how her novels capture her world –
    small town life in 18th century England.

    Speaking of Jane Austen by Sheila Kaye-Smith and G. B. Stern

    4 Regency Teacups. While extremely dated, 1944, many interesting points. As many said on Goodreads, I certainly disagree with the authors on many points. However, very interesting points. The best part of the book for me was when each author gave a paragraph of their views on characters. For me only, an interesting connection with Sheila Kaye-Smith. My favorite composer, Ralph Vaughan Williams, wrote the music to the film version of her book “Joanna Godden”.

    “She was far too conscientious an artist to compromise with truth, and we may be sure that the facts she ignored could be ignored, and almost certainly were ignored by the kind of people she writes about….” -Sheila Kaye-Smith

    Finally, I’ll have to look for the exact quote. However, one of the authors says that a heroine of 20 years in Jane Austen’s time would be 7 years older in 1944. Perhaps we can add another 1 1/2 to that equation. For me, that’s the best answer to utter complete NONSENSE of saying so-so is too old to play so-so!!!!! ie Emma Thompson is too old to play Elinor Dashwood. Tell me whether you liked how they played character, not that so-so was too old(I suppose it might matter if the difference is 20 yrs but surely not 5-15 yrs). There a quite a few Janeites who I highly highly respect who wave the age comment. If the actress is all wrong for part, I’m looking at you Billie Piper, that’s clearly fair game. -Kirk

    The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

    “If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out.”

    http://www.shmoop.com/pride-and-prejudice/aunt-uncle-gardiner.html

    Aunt and Uncle Gardiner

    Character Analysis
    Mr. Gardiner is Mrs. Bennet’s brother, but they’re not much alike:

    Mr. Gardiner was a sensible, gentlemanlike man, greatly superior to his sister, as well by nature as education. The Netherfield ladies would have had difficulty in believing that a man who lived by trade, and within view of his own warehouses, could have been so well-bred and agreeable. Mrs. Gardiner, who was several years younger than Mrs. Bennet and Mrs. Phillips, was an amiable, intelligent, elegant woman, and a great favourite with all her Longbourn nieces. Between the two eldest and herself especially, there subsisted a particular regard. They had frequently been staying with her in town. (25.2)

    Besides giving Elizabeth and Jane some much needed parental figures—seriously, those two need at least one sane and involved adult in their lives, right?—the Gardiners can also be seen as part of the whole discussion about what makes a gentleman. They’re born into the middle class—not the gentry, like Darcy—and Uncle Gardiner makes his money by working as a lawyer rather than by inheriting it. Yet, when Darcy meets them, he is totally floored by how he would never in million years be able to tell that they aren’t born gentlefolk.

    Whew. That gives us a little hope for our own class status.

    Photo: http://www.shmoop.com/pride-and-prejudice/aunt-uncle-gardiner.html

Aunt and Uncle Gardiner

Character Analysis
Mr. Gardiner is Mrs. Bennet's brother, but they're not much alike:

Mr. Gardiner was a sensible, gentlemanlike man, greatly superior to his sister, as well by nature as education. The Netherfield ladies would have had difficulty in believing that a man who lived by trade, and within view of his own warehouses, could have been so well-bred and agreeable. Mrs. Gardiner, who was several years younger than Mrs. Bennet and Mrs. Phillips, was an amiable, intelligent, elegant woman, and a great favourite with all her Longbourn nieces. Between the two eldest and herself especially, there subsisted a particular regard. They had frequently been staying with her in town. (25.2)

Besides giving Elizabeth and Jane some much needed parental figures—seriously, those two need at least one sane and involved adult in their lives, right?—the Gardiners can also be seen as part of the whole discussion about what makes a gentleman. They're born into the middle class—not the gentry, like Darcy—and Uncle Gardiner makes his money by working as a lawyer rather than by inheriting it. Yet, when Darcy meets them, he is totally floored by how he would never in million years be able to tell that they aren't born gentlefolk.

Whew. That gives us a little hope for our own class status.
    http://www.shmoop.com/northanger-abbey/eleanor-tilney.html

    Eleanor Tilney

    Character Analysis
    Eleanor Tilney is arguably the most serious character in the book, on two levels. On the one hand, she is serious in terms of personality. She’s polite and earnest and maybe just a little boring. On the other hand, her life circumstances are also serious. Her mom died when she was young and her dad is a bit of a control freak. But at least a Viscount magically drops from the sky for her to marry at the novel’s end, which conveniently allows the people in whom we have a more vested interest (Henry and Catherine) to get married.

    If that’s all sounding a bit familiar, it might be because Eleanor perfectly fits the criteria for a heroine that Jane Austen outlines at the beginning of Northanger Abbey. We’ve got the family tragedy, the loss of a mother, a somewhat villainous patriarch, a creepy setting (the Abbey), a mysterious star-crossed love, years of suffering and trial, etc.

    So why is the novel’s protagonist and ostensible heroine, Catherine, classified as anything but a heroine? And why does Eleanor Tilney, a somewhat dull secondary character, epitomize a Gothic novel heroine as described by Austen? Well, this might be because Austen is poking fun at the Gothic novel. By having Eleanor, a nice if somewhat uninteresting character, perfectly match the criteria for a Gothic novel heroine, Austen might be implying that Gothic novel heroines are overrated and a bit boring when compared to more dynamic characters like Catherine. Eleanor’s personality doesn’t appear to alter much at all over the course of the text, unlike Catherine, who evolves.

    Aside from making a subtle and satirical point about the Gothic novel, Eleanor also contrasts with Isabella Thorpe. Eleanor and Isabella are both Catherine’s friends and the younger sisters of Catherine’s two love interests. So Eleanor has a vital position in the novel’s sibling structure, where three contrasting pairs of brothers and sisters interact.

    Catherine, who grows up considerably over the course of the novel, eventually drops her superficial friendship with Isabella in favor of a more mature friendship with Eleanor. In many ways, the mature and reasonable Eleanor represents the type of adult that Catherine makes some progress towards becoming. Eleanor is, after all, rational, kind, well-mannered, well-read, and is capable to keeping up with her brother’s wit. And if she’s not as exciting and wildly entertaining as Isabella, well, that’s probably a good thing. After all, she does get rewarded with her very own Viscount in the end, which just proves that good deeds, like putting up with her difficult father, really can be rewarded.

    Eleanor Tilney in Northanger Abbey
    Shmoop guide to Eleanor Tilney in Northanger Abbey. Eleanor Tilney analysis by Ph.D. and Masters students from Stanford, Harvard, and Berkeley
    Team Marianne!!!!!!!

    http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/dreams-hopes-plans-quotes-3.html:

    Quote #8
    Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another! — and that other, a man who had suffered no less than herself under the event of a former attachment, — whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married, — and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat! (50.14)

    This remarkable sentence sums up the whole of Marianne’s development – from an idealistic, romantic, unrealistic young girl to a mature young woman, free of her childish prejudices. The outlook is good for this new Marianne.

    Photo: Team Marianne!!!!!!!

http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/dreams-hopes-plans-quotes-3.html:

Quote #8
Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims. She was born to overcome an affection formed so late in life as at seventeen, and with no sentiment superior to strong esteem and lively friendship, voluntarily to give her hand to another! -- and that other, a man who had suffered no less than herself under the event of a former attachment, -- whom, two years before, she had considered too old to be married, -- and who still sought the constitutional safeguard of a flannel waistcoat! (50.14)

This remarkable sentence sums up the whole of Marianne's development – from an idealistic, romantic, unrealistic young girl to a mature young woman, free of her childish prejudices. The outlook is good for this new Marianne.
    http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/love-quotes.html:

    Quote #1
    “It is enough,” said she; “to say that he is unlike Fanny is enough. It implies everything amiable. I love him already.”

    “I think you will like him,” said Elinor, “when you know more of him.”

    “Like him!” replied her mother with a smile. “I can feel no sentiment of approbation inferior to love.”

    “You may esteem him.”

    “I have never yet known what it was to separate esteem and love.” (3.8)

    Mrs. Dashwood’s vision of love, and personal relationships in general, is much more loose and all-encompassing than Elinor’s – basically, “love” and “like” are confused in her book. She’s willing to “love” anyone, while Elinor has positive feelings broken down more specifically into the intellectual and emotional (“esteem” versus “love”).

    Photo: 28F in Boston. A warmer welcome to Alessandra!!!!! 

http://www.shmoop.com/sense-and-sensibility/love-quotes.html:

Quote #1
"It is enough," said she; "to say that he is unlike Fanny is enough. It implies everything amiable. I love him already."

"I think you will like him," said Elinor, "when you know more of him."

"Like him!" replied her mother with a smile. "I can feel no sentiment of approbation inferior to love."

"You may esteem him."

"I have never yet known what it was to separate esteem and love." (3.8)

Mrs. Dashwood's vision of love, and personal relationships in general, is much more loose and all-encompassing than Elinor's – basically, "love" and "like" are confused in her book. She's willing to "love" anyone, while Elinor has positive feelings broken down more specifically into the intellectual and emotional ("esteem" versus "love").
    I watched the Bollywood version of Sense and Sensibility last week. 4.5 regency teapots out of 5! I have the view that Emma Thompson’s S&S(95) is really Marianne’s story and the equally lovely Dan Stevens/Hattie Morahan S&S(2008) is really Elinor’s story. As a Team Marianne member, I feel that this one is very much Marianne’s story. Some fun songs and the relationship between Marianne and Brandon(Major here) is well developed. We see a glimpse of their future life together. Oddly, the film starts with the Major being injured in battle. I was wondering if I had picked up the wrong film. Indeed, “Elinor” in this story is abit weak. Also, I wished there was more interaction between the sisters. Still, there alot of fun features in this enjoyable film. I have watched the other two Bollywood Jane Austen films and loved them. This one is my favorite. Aishwarya Rai plays Marianne here and then she went on to play Lizzie in Bride and Prejudice. Has Kate Winslet played any “Lizzie” types?? -Kirk

    http://atpemberley.blogspot.com/2009/06/before-i-review-this-indian-version-of.html

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