Posted by: rearadmiral | March 8, 2014

The first rule of JA fight club…..

shared JASNA – North Texas‘s photo.
Posted by Kirk Companion · 8 hours ago
 
 
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Caroline Bingley(1995) on Downton Abbey, how “middle class”!!!!

Monica Fairview shared a link.
27 minutes ago near London, United Kingdom
Looking forward to some new blood especially Anna Chancellor.
http://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio…See More

Downton Abbey: Richard E Grant and Anna Chancellor join cast of ITV drama
Withnail star to play a guest of the Granthams as Harriet Walter and Peter Egan reprise their roles for fifth series. By John Plunkett
 
“You’re participating in HarperCollins’s Jane Austen Project in which writers create contemporary versions of her novels. What can you tell us about your “Emma,” which will be published later this year?” Slight spoilers follow those comments. 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/novelist-alexander-mccall-smith-explores-true-love-in-the-forever-girl/2014/03/04/3e7b4390-9f25-11e3-b8d8-94577ff66b28_story.html?tid=hpModule_5fb4f58a-8a7a-11e2-98d9-3012c1cd8d1e

Novelist Alexander McCall Smith explores true love in ‘The Forever Girl’
 
 
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The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

“We none of us want to hear the bill of fare. A friendly meeting, and not a fine dinner, is all we have in view. A turkey, or a goose, or a leg of mutton, or whatever you and your cook chuse to give us.”
Mr. Grant, Mansfield Park Chapter 22 (II,4)

Photo: The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

"We none of us want to hear the bill of fare. A friendly meeting, and not a fine dinner, is all we have in view. A turkey, or a goose, or a leg of mutton, or whatever you and your cook chuse to give us."
Mr. Grant, Mansfield Park Chapter 22 (II,4)
 
The first rule of Jane Austen fight club…..
 
Who is ready for Summer already?! Bingley’s Teas will pack up the teas and be back at the largest Jane Austen Festival in the US this July!! We hope to see you there- July 18-20th We’re so excited we could punch somebody! er…….pinch ourselves, yes pinch ourselves.
Photo: Who is ready for Summer already?! Bingley's Teas will pack up the teas and be back at the largest Jane Austen Festival in the US this July!!  We hope to see you there- July 18-20th  We're so excited we could punch somebody!  er.......pinch ourselves, yes pinch ourselves.
 
“I’d never heard of her myself. Which was probably a good thing for me. It was as if a fledgling literary critic, on his first assignment, had been dispatched to meet and interview Jane Austen”. -Jay McInerney “Bacchus & Me: Adventures in the Wine Cellar pg xxi
Austen In Boston: A Jane Austen Book Club's photo.
 

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The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

“My sister and Mr. Bertram. I am so glad your eldest cousin is gone, that he may be Mr. Bertram again. There is something in the sound of Mr. Edmund Bertram so formal, so pitiful, so younger-brother-like, that I detest it.”

“How differently we feel!” cried Fanny. “To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning, so entirely without warmth or character! It just stands for a gentleman, and that’s all. But there is nobleness in the name of Edmund. It is a name of heroism and renown; of kings, princes, and knights; and seems to breathe the spirit of chivalry and warm affections.”

“I grant you the name is good in itself, and Lord Edmund or Sir Edmund sound delightfully; but sink it under the chill, the annihilation of a Mr., and Mr. Edmund is no more than Mr. John or Mr. Thomas.”

Photo: The Talk Like Jane Austen Quote of the Day:

 "My sister and Mr. Bertram. I am so glad your eldest cousin is gone, that he may be Mr. Bertram again. There is something in the sound of Mr. Edmund Bertram so formal, so pitiful, so younger-brother-like, that I detest it."

"How differently we feel!" cried Fanny. "To me, the sound of Mr. Bertram is so cold and nothing-meaning, so entirely without warmth or character! It just stands for a gentleman, and that's all. But there is nobleness in the name of Edmund. It is a name of heroism and renown; of kings, princes, and knights; and seems to breathe the spirit of chivalry and warm affections."

"I grant you the name is good in itself, and Lord Edmund or Sir Edmund sound delightfully; but sink it under the chill, the annihilation of a Mr., and Mr. Edmund is no more than Mr. John or Mr. Thomas."
 
A fancy hat at Fancy That!
Photo: A fancy hat at Fancy That!
 
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/persuasion/themes.html

Separate Spheres

The idea of separate spheres was a nineteenth-century doctrine that there are two domains of life: the public and the domestic. Traditionally, the male would be in charge of the public domain (finances, legal matters, etc.) while the female would be in charge of the private domain (running the house, ordering the servants, etc.). This novel questions the idea of separate spheres by introducing the Crofts. Presented as an example of a happy, ideal marriage, Admiral and Mrs. Croft share the spheres of their life. Mrs. Croft joins her husband on his ships at sea, and Admiral Croft is happy to help his wife in the chores around the home. They have such a partnership that they even share the task of driving a carriage. Austen, in this novel, challenges the prevailing notion of separate spheres.

The Changing Ideal of the Gentleman

This novel presents two very different versions of the English gentleman. On one hand is Sir Walter, the traditional, land-owning, titled man who avoids work and seeks comfort. On the other hand are Captain Wentworth and Admiral Croft. Both naval officers are working men who have made their own fortunes. Though their manners are impeccable, they are not of the same high social rank as Sir Walter. In this period of English history, the definition of a ‘gentleman’ was growing increasingly more flexible; this novel reflects that change.

Photo: http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/persuasion/themes.html

Separate Spheres

The idea of separate spheres was a nineteenth-century doctrine that there are two domains of life: the public and the domestic. Traditionally, the male would be in charge of the public domain (finances, legal matters, etc.) while the female would be in charge of the private domain (running the house, ordering the servants, etc.). This novel questions the idea of separate spheres by introducing the Crofts. Presented as an example of a happy, ideal marriage, Admiral and Mrs. Croft share the spheres of their life. Mrs. Croft joins her husband on his ships at sea, and Admiral Croft is happy to help his wife in the chores around the home. They have such a partnership that they even share the task of driving a carriage. Austen, in this novel, challenges the prevailing notion of separate spheres.

The Changing Ideal of the Gentleman

This novel presents two very different versions of the English gentleman. On one hand is Sir Walter, the traditional, land-owning, titled man who avoids work and seeks comfort. On the other hand are Captain Wentworth and Admiral Croft. Both naval officers are working men who have made their own fortunes. Though their manners are impeccable, they are not of the same high social rank as Sir Walter. In this period of English history, the definition of a 'gentleman' was growing increasingly more flexible; this novel reflects that change.


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