Posted by: rearadmiral | March 16, 2014

Jane Austen and the Arts and other book reviews(book reviews by others encouraged!!)

“Jane Austen and the Arts: Elegance, Propriety, and Harmony” edited by Natasha Duquette and Elisabeth LenckosThere are 14 essays in this collection, most of which I found readable and enjoyable. Especially enjoyable were the four essays in Part One: The Fine Arts in Austen’s World: Music, Dance, and Portraiture. The favorite of the group being Kelly M. McDonald’s “A Reputation for Accomplishment”:Marianne Dashwood and Emma Woodhouse as Artistic Performers”.
In Part Two, Alice Davenport’s “An Adaptable Aesthetic: Eighteenth-Century Landscape, Ann Radcliffe, and Jane Austen, was most enjoyable and illuminating.

Under the category of saving the best for last, the last essay in Part Three (“Delicacy of Taste”Redeemed: The Aesthetic Judgment and Spiritual Formation of Austen’s Clergymen-Heroes by Frederick and Natasha Duquette) in this highly interesting book is one of the most delightful things I have read. Why? It agrees with some of my opinions(and how rare is that those whose knowledge is immeasurably superior to mine agree with me) of a certain smirking non-hero. “Henry Tilney is an eloquent man…..YET REVEALING A STRIKING MORAL BLINDNESS”(caps all mine). Natasha and Frederick Duquette continue “…note Henry’s soothingly lyrical tone in his assurance that Frederick and Isabella…yet HE QUICKLY FALTERS INTO LOW IMAGERY AND FARCE AS HE DISMISSES THE RISK OF THEIR FLINTING”(again, all caps is all mine….). Oh, there’s so much more but I’ll stop here. No more will I listen to the few Tilneyites, who I respect on other matters, that I give him a fifth or sixth chance(rant sorta over). Shirley’s pithy comment that “Henry Tilney is a Regency “Metrosexual” dovetails well with this essay. To be fair, I believe authors think the “non-hero” in question will improve his narcissistic(my word not theirs) etc. behavior. Needless to say, yet I’ll say it, I don’t. -Kirk

4.25 Regency Teacups

Photo: "Jane Austen and the Arts: Elegance, Propriety, and Harmony" edited by Natasha Duquette and Elisabeth Lenckos</p>
<p>There are 14 essays in this collection, most of which I found readable and enjoyable. Especially enjoyable were the four essays in Part One: The Fine Arts in Austen's World: Music, Dance, and Portraiture. The favorite of the group being Kelly M. McDonald's "A Reputation for Accomplishment":Marianne Dashwood and Emma Woodhouse as Artistic Performers".<br />
In Part Two, Alice Davenport's "An Adaptable Aesthetic: Eighteenth-Century Landscape, Ann Radcliffe, and Jane Austen, was most enjoyable and illuminating.  </p>
<p>Under the category of saving the best for last, the last essay in Part Three ("Delicacy of Taste"Redeemed: The Aesthetic Judgment and Spiritual Formation of Austen's Clergymen-Heroes by Frederick and Natasha Duquette) in this highly interesting book is one of the most delightful things I have read. Why? It agrees with some of my opinions(and how rare is that those whose knowledge is immeasurably superior to mine agree with me) of a certain smirking non-hero. "Henry Tilney is an eloquent man.....YET REVEALING A STRIKING MORAL BLINDNESS"(caps all mine). Natasha and Frederick Duquette continue "...note Henry's soothingly lyrical tone in his assurance that Frederick and Isabella...yet HE QUICKLY FALTERS INTO LOW IMAGERY AND FARCE AS HE DISMISSES THE RISK OF THEIR FLINTING"(again, all caps is all mine....).  Oh, there's so much more but I'll stop here. No more will I listen to the few Tilneyites, who I respect on other matters, that I give him a fifth or sixth chance(rant sorta over). Shirley's pithy comment that "Henry Tilney is a Regency "Metrosexual" dovetails well with this essay. To be fair, I believe authors think the "non-hero" in question will improve his narcissistic(my word not theirs) etc. behavior. Needless to say, yet I'll say it, I don't. -Kirk </p>
<p>4.25 Regency Teacups
From something I posted on the Goodreads Jane Austen discussion page…I got just a bit carried away…..”As I’m stuck in the (mostly)70s/Singer Songwriter Era some(all?) of these might be unknown but…and I’m off topic because Leticia said songs that remind you of Austen novels but I had way too much fun with this so…..)”:

Sir Walter Eliot to himself: James Blunt “You’re Beautiful”
The Kellynch Hall mirrors to Sir Walter: Carly Simon “You’re So Vain”
Anne Eliot to Captain Wentworth: Dan Fogelberg’s “Seeing You Again”
Lady Catherine to everyone: Frank Sinatra “My Way”
Emma to Mr K: Orleans “Dance with Me”
Mr K to Emma: Orleans “Love Takes Time”
Darcy to Lizzy: Orleans “Still the One”
Fanny to Edmund: Yvonne Elliman “If I Can’t Have You”
Mary Crawford to Edmund: Pink Floyd “Money”
” ” ” : Dido “I’m No Angel”
Anne Eliot to Captain Wentworth: Yvonne Elliman “Hello Stranger”
Captain Wentworth to Anne Eliot: Joe Cocker “The Letter”
Catherine to Mr. Tilney: Fontella Bass “Rescue Me”
Marianne to Willoughby :All versions “I Heard It Through the Grapevine”
Elinor to Edward: ELO “Strange Magic”
Col Brandon to Marianne:Cat Stevens “Oh Very Young”
Lizzy to Darcy: Olivia Newton-John “Have You Never Been Mellow”
Mrs. Croft to Admiral Croft: The Moody Blues “Sitting At The Wheel”
Lizzy to Bingley: The Beatles “She Loves You”
Edward to Elinor: Mary MacGregor “Torn Between Two Lovers”
Elinor/Marianne/Margaret/Mrs Dashwood to Fanny and John Dashwood: Foreigner “Cold as Ice”
Elinor to Lucy Steele and Mrs. Ferrars: Foreigner “Cold as Ice”
Edmund to Mary: Joe Cocker “Unchain My Heart”
Marianne to Col Brandon: Lulu “To Sir With Love” (yes, the Col. isn’t a Sir, but he should be)
Me to Jane Austen: Sugababies “Too Lost in You”

Holly Christina “Jane Austen”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vD2XIa

Emma to herself: 10cc “I’m Not in Love”

Jane Bennet to Bingley: Beatles “8 Days a Week”
Caroline to Lizzy: ELO “Turn to Stone”
Anne and Capt Wentworth: duet “Reunited”
Willoughby to Marianne:Elvin Bishop “Fooled around and fell in love”
Bingley to Darcy:Bee Gees “You Should Be Dancing”
Adm Croft to the Musgrove Sisters: Lynyrd Skynyrd “What’s Your Name”
Aunt Norris to Fanny: Nick Lowe “Cruel to be Kind”
Eliza Williams to Willoughby Three Degrees “When will I see you again”
Marianne to Willoughby: James Taylor “Fire and Rain”
Robert Ferras to himself: ZZ Top “Sharp Dressed Man”
Lady Susan and Catherine Vernon duet: ELO “Evil Woman”
Frank Churchill and Jane Fairfax duet: Atlantic Starr “Secret Lovers”
Mrs Bennet to her daughters:The 5th Dimension “Wedding Bell Blues”
Lizzy to Mr Collins: Police: “Don’t stand so close to me”
Charlotte Lucus to Mr Collins:Tina Turner “What’s Love Got to Do With It”
Neighbor Network of Spies to Catherine : Police “Every Breath You Take”
Fanny to Edmund:Marilyn McCoo and Billy Davis Jr “You don’t have to be a star”
Lucy Steele to Ferrars money: James Taylor: “How Sweet It is”
Anyone who’s read all of this to me: Simon and Garfunkel “The Sound of Silence”

Mansfield Park Quote of the Day”There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong, we make a second better: we find comfort somewhere”.

The Edwardians by Vita Sackville-WestAs some know, we abandoned this book as multiple people were unable to obtain a copy. I was able to obtain a copy and read it. -Kirk

*****Slight spoilers*****

I found the book extremely dreary except for a few sections about nature and a few other parts. The young Duke(and his mother: picture the step-mother of Wives and Daughters) are awful except for his love of nature and his respect for those who work the land. It is satire of a “fruitcake” kind ie not leavened with JA’s wit and humor. Too heavy. The Duke’s sister is much more likable(a bit of a Lady Sybil) but she only appears a few times in the book. The part where she rips his hedonic lifestyle is worth part of the dreary reading….no Mary Crawford is she!!!! 2.5 out of five regency teacups. 1.25-1.5 for most of the book.

I love reading blogs like the one below. -Kirk
Pen to Paper: Pride & Prejudice by Jane Austen: Rediscovering Austen
The Mysterious Death of Miss Jane Austen The Mysterious Death of Miss Austen by Lindsay AshfordWhile not a fan of mysteries(except for Boston’s own Spenser for Hire), I enjoyed this one. Having heard the recent BBC 4 Radio adaptation, I knew who did it. That didn’t lessen my enjoyment. My two favorite Austen reviews, Laurel-Austenprose and Meredith-Austeneque Reviews, both liked the book too. I loved meeting Jane Austen’s nieces Anna Austen(later Anna Lefroy) and Fanny Knight(later Caroline Bingley) and their interactions with Jane Austen.

4 regency teacups out of 5

Photo: The Mysterious Death of Miss Jane Austen The Mysterious Death of Miss Austen by Lindsay Ashford </p>
<p>While not a fan of mysteries(except for Boston's own Spenser for Hire), I enjoyed this one. Having heard the recent BBC 4 Radio adaptation, I knew who did it. That didn't lessen my enjoyment. My two favorite Austen reviews, Laurel-Austenprose and Meredith-Austeneque Reviews, both liked the book too. I loved meeting Jane Austen's nieces Anna Austen(later Anna Lefroy) and Fanny Knight(later Caroline Bingley) and their interactions with Jane Austen.  </p>
<p>4 regency teacups out of 5
Oxford Classics (@OWC_Oxford) tweeted at 9:54 AM on Mon, Mar 10, 2014:
Why not explore the “linguistic goldmine” of Jane Austen’s letters this afternoon? http://t.co/tzjVsqJB32
(https://twitter.com/OWC_Oxford/status/443022119207968769)
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Responses

  1. Kirk – did you come up with the songs list? – it is fabulous – can I re-post it elsewhere??
    Deb

    • Hi Deb, thanks so much! I’m entirely to blame…it took a few weeks. Mostly certainly you can re-post it! It didn’t get any love on Facebook. *pouts* Cheers, Kirk

  2. Hi, Kirk – Deb sent me the link to the review of _Jane Austen and the Arts_. So glad that you enjoyed the essays. And thanks for the kind words about my Marianne and Emma!

    Your list has me humming “Reunited” as I type… Can’t believe Facebook gave it the cold shoulder.

    k

    • Hi K!
      Thanks for your comment regarding the list! Your comment and Deb’s comment make up for the lack of FB love. 🙂 And, of course, thank you for your essay. As a big fan of Marianne and Emma, I enjoy reading about them. I was especially glad to like the essay as one of high school classmates shared your name(I don’t remember her middle name, just remember it printed as M). Lol, now I have “Reunited” in my head too. Not the worse thing….I enjoy your posts too. Cheers!

  3. Kelly and I might be your fanbase of two, but here is the link to my re-posting your song list on my blog: http://janeausteninvermont.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/jane-austen-in-song-or-how-the-1970s-was-really-all-about-jane-austen/

    I have been humming along with Kelly all morning!

    • A great fanbase of two! Thanks for sharing it! It appears to be making some appearances in the Jane Austen. 🙂 I’m crossing my fingers and toes that I can make it, especially if the location is easy to get to, for your wonderful program on 6/8. JA and the Navy is one of my favorite topics. Cheers!

    • Thank you again for addressing the comments on your blog regarding the non-70’s songs. My response would not have been so polite….my response would have been more of a John Knightley’s “It’s snowing” response…..grrrr…pfft. Another one…..Henry Crawford first and then Edmund sing the Bee Gees “Fanny(Be Tended With My Love)”.

  4. Can’t believe I didn’t think of this one before….
    Adm Croft, Capt W, and Lieutenant William Price sing The Village People: “In the Navy”

  5. Hi lovely list; thank you for sharing. I want to share my current reading with you as it is a good suggestive read: Shadow on the coast of Maine by Lea Wait; & Jane and the Damned by Janet Mullany.

    I hope that you can give them a try one day and let us know what you think of them. Take care, Ainee

    • Thank you for sharing seule 771! I love Maine, so that one interests me. I was just at the Maine coast with Jeanne Birdsall’s “The Penderwicks at Point Mouette”.

      • Maine is not a place that I have been for quite sometime ago. I visited York Maine and found this lovely bookshop right near the water and where there are shops etc. I don’t recall the name as this was nearly decades ago. It is a lovely place, I concur.


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