Posted by: rearadmiral | August 2, 2014

Short week, a bit of “homespun”, the new Emma is arriving in Nov.!


Fitzwilliam Darcy’s inner struggles #12.
(via garrulus http://bit.ly/14YTVrh)

Previous: http://on.fb.me/1xwG1qu


My new Pajamas….aren’t they cute? Good Night

http://sarahemsley.com/2014/08/01/angry-white-female-an-apology-for-mrs-norris/

“Only think what grand things were produced there by our all going with him one hot day in August to drive about the grounds, and see his genius take fire.” ‘Mansfield Park’ by Jane Austen

I’m looking forward to this one! -Kirk
EMMA

The picture below is of the cover of EMMA, which will come out in November. I enjoyed writing that book so much – in fact, I felt bereft when I had finished it. I wanted it to to continue.

The real challenge, in my view, was to portray Emma in such a way that we sympathised with her, while at the same time we saw through her interfering ways. There are people like that: they have very obvious faults, but we still like them. Most of us, I imagine, have such a friend. Nobody likes a complete saint. (I only know one unqualified saint, I think, and come to think of it, and everybody likes him. So perhaps I should withdraw what I have just written. He is an old friend who has, as far as I can see, no flaws. Most of my friends, though, have various defects – and that, I think, is one of the pleasures of friendship: spotting one’s friends faults. It is a very interesting subject, of course, and an idle hour can easily be spent listing one’s friends’ weaker points … Of course, at the end of the day, you have to say; Enough of that, now let’s think about their finer points. That list usually far outweighs the earlier list, although it may not be as much fun to compile it. The worst fun of all is making a list of one’s own faults … Don’t even go there, as the expression has it.)

Enough digression: here is a little excerpt from EMMA. The housekeeper, Mrs Firhill, has observed Emma as a little girl showing exactly those qualities that will be so striking in her personality as a young woman. I remember being told by a psychiatrist friend: If you want to see what your children are thinking, watch their play. She was absolutely right. So here we have Emma with her dolls:

“Once Mrs Firhill had identified the issue, the signs of Emma’s desire to control others seemed to become more and more obvious. On one occasion Mrs Firhill came across Emma playing by herself in the playroom, Isabella being in bed that day with a heavy cold. In a corner of the room was the girls’ dolls’ house – an ancient construction that had been discovered, dusty and discoloured, in the attic. Now with its walls repainted and repapered, the house was once again in use, filled with tiny furniture and a family of dolls that the girls shared between them. Long hours were spent attending to this house, and in moving the dolls from one room to another in accordance with the tides of doll private life that no adult could fathom.

Unseen by Emma, Mrs Firhill watched for a few minutes while Emma addressed her dolls and tidied their rooms.

“You are going to have stay in your room until further notice,” she scolded one, a small boy doll clad in a Breton sailor’s blue and white jersey.

“And you,” she said to another one, a thin doll with arms out of which the stuffing had begun to leak, “And you are never going to find a husband unless you do as I say.”

Mrs Firhill drew in her breath. It would have been very easy to laugh at this tiny display of directing behaviour, but she felt somehow that it was not a laughing matter. What she was witnessing was a perfect revelation of a character trait: Emma must want to control people if this was the way she treated her dolls. Bossy little madam, thought Mrs Firhill.”

Of course we know that Emma changes, but it takes a bit of time, and there are casualties on the way. Yes, she is a bossy little madam, and yet … and yet … It is the “and yets” that save her, just as it is the “and yets” which save the rest of us.

Alexander McCall Smith
Photo: EMMA

The picture below is of the cover of EMMA, which will come out in November. I enjoyed writing that book so much – in fact, I felt bereft when I had finished it. I wanted it to to continue.

The real challenge, in my view, was to portray Emma in such a way that we sympathised with her, while at the same time we saw through her interfering ways. There are people like that: they have very obvious faults, but we still like them. Most of us, I imagine, have such a friend. Nobody likes a complete saint. (I only know one unqualified saint, I think, and come to think of it, and everybody likes him. So perhaps I should withdraw what I have just written. He is an old friend who has, as far as I can see, no flaws. Most of my friends, though, have various defects – and that, I think, is one of the pleasures of friendship: spotting one’s friends faults. It is a very interesting subject, of course, and an idle hour can easily be spent listing one’s friends’ weaker points … Of course, at the end of the day, you have to say; Enough of that, now let’s think about their finer points. That list usually far outweighs the earlier list, although it may not be as much fun to compile it. The worst fun of all is making a list of one’s own faults … Don’t even go there, as the expression has it.)

Enough digression: here is a little excerpt from EMMA. The housekeeper, Mrs Firhill, has observed Emma as a little girl showing exactly those qualities that will be so striking in her personality as a young woman. I remember being told by a psychiatrist friend: If you want to see what your children are thinking, watch their play. She was absolutely right. So here we have Emma with her dolls:

“Once Mrs Firhill had identified the issue, the signs of Emma’s desire to control others seemed to become more and more obvious. On one occasion Mrs Firhill came across Emma playing by herself in the playroom, Isabella being in bed that day with a heavy cold. In a corner of the room was the girls’ dolls’ house – an ancient construction that had been discovered, dusty and discoloured, in the attic. Now with its walls repainted and repapered, the house was once again in use, filled with tiny furniture and a family of dolls that the girls shared between them. Long hours were spent attending to this house, and in moving the dolls from one room to another in accordance with the tides of doll private life that no adult could fathom.

Unseen by Emma, Mrs Firhill watched for a few minutes while Emma addressed her dolls and tidied their rooms.

“You are going to have stay in your room until further notice,” she scolded one, a small boy doll clad in a Breton sailor’s blue and white jersey.

“And you,” she said to another one, a thin doll with arms out of which the stuffing had begun to leak, “And you are never going to find a husband unless you do as I say.”

Mrs Firhill drew in her breath. It would have been very easy to laugh at this tiny display of directing behaviour, but she felt somehow that it was not a laughing matter. What she was witnessing was a perfect revelation of a character trait: Emma must want to control people if this was the way she treated her dolls. Bossy little madam, thought Mrs Firhill.”

Of course we know that Emma changes, but it takes a bit of time, and there are casualties on the way. Yes, she is a bossy little madam, and yet … and yet … It is the “and yets” that save her, just as it is the “and yets” which save the rest of us.

Alexander McCall Smith

I read this book but was somewhat puzzled by it. -Kirk

From JASNA Oregon and SW Washington ‘s great web site:

New title — ‘The Hidden Jane Austen’
07/27/20140 Comments

A new title of close readings of Jane Austen’s novels was published last month, The Hidden Jane Austen by John Wiltshire. It promises to be an interesting read, if any of our members are interested in delving into deeper psychological explorations of Austen’s characters.
Through a series of compelling close readings of key passages in each novel, Wiltshire underscores Austen’s unique ability to penetrate the hidden inner motives and impulses of her characters, and reveals some of the secrets of her narrative art.
There are also some special reader features on the Cambridge University Press website, including a book trailer and a free preview of the introduction and first chapter!

Click here for book trailer online (or watch video below)
Click here for free preview and chapter
Click here for more ordering info and current discount code

The Hidden Jane Austen
Leading Austen scholar John Wiltshire offers new interpretations of your favorite Jane Austen novels in this landmark study.


Haha

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