Posted by: rearadmiral | June 3, 2017

6/3 June Jane…with lots of Fanny and Emma

“Constant activity has made Knightley hardy, constant involvement with others has taught him the pleasure of altruism. Where the humanity of Mr Woodhouse and Emma, rich, idle and uninvolved, shows signs of atrophying from disuse, Knightley’s human potential has clearly been developed by his vocational involvements. Where they live locked in worlds created by imagination, he is well-informed and pre-eminently sane. The reader’s most convincing guarantee that Emma, at the end of the novel, will become a better woman, derives not from her disillusionments and consequent resolutions- for we have seen her, like characters in The Idler, make good resolutions before – but rather from the fact that, as Knightley’s wife, she will enter his life of activity and involvements. It is these, and not the individual’s resolutions, that are guarantees of sanity and even happiness in the world of Emma.”
pg 73 “Jane Austen’s Emma: A Sourcebook” Edited by Paula Byrne Routledge Taylor & Francis Group London and New York 2004. The quote is “From Jane Nardin, ‘Jane Austen and the Problem of Leisure’, in D. Monaghan, ed., “Jane Austen in a Social Context(London: MacMillan, 1981), pp. 105-22”

Unknown Edith Wharton Play Surfaces In 2009, a cache of letters from the young Edith Wharton to her governess caused a stir when they turned up at auction. Now, an archive in Texas has yielded another startling Wharton discovery: an entirely unknown play. “The Shadow of a Doubt,” Wharton’s only known finished play and the first full work by her to surface in 25 years, was set to be staged in New York in early 1901, before the production was abandoned for unknown reasons and forgotten. [ 144 more words ]

https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/…/ny-times-unkno…/

NY Times: Unknown Edith Wharton Play Surfaces
Unknown Edith Wharton Play Surfaces In 2009, a cache of letters from the young Edith Wharton to her governess caused a stir when they turned up at auction. Now, an archive in Texas has yielded…
EDITHWHARTONSOCIETY.WORDPRESS.COM

“The sun was just direct enough and the wind just absent enough to make the Bertram’ roof-deck tolerable in the chill April air. Weather permitting, the deck was Finley(Price) and Oliver’s(Bertram) favorite homework spot. Unfortunately, since the street fair last weekend, Emma Crawford had become a fixture in their lives, including during homework time.
Which was just super.”
-pg 35 Kate Watson “Seeking Mansfield” Flux, an imprint of North Star Editions, Inc.
Although it had some really difficult moments…4.5 out of 5 regency teacups. -Kirk

MP 1983 and Amazing Grace 2007

“Given the extent of Fanny’s resistance to convention, it is small wonder that Jane Austen expected few readers to like her; even less would they like the author’s articulation of a deep suspicion of many apparently engaging and amusing aspects of social life. Yet Fanny – both poor and female – overturns the values of Mansfield Park, and has by the end of the novel succeeded in making the majority of the characters look either ridiculous, evil, or unreliable in their judgement.”
pg 30 Mary Evans “Jane Austen and the State” Tavistock Publications London and New York 1987

“Money, she realizes, can buy taste, charm, and the appearance of education. Wealth does, of course, have its spectacular failures, in that no amount of money can transform Mr Rushworth into anything other than a very stupid , dull young man…….”
pg 31 Mary Evans “Jane Austen and the State” Tavistock Publications London and New York 1987

“Emma’s final misunderstanding is cleared up when she discovers that Mr Knightley is not in love with Harriet, as she fears, but with Emma herself…..When the misunderstanding is finally resolved, he shows his characteristic awkwardness with the language of sentiment: ‘I cannot make speeches…if I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.’ Similarly, Austen does not let her lovers indulge in sentimental talk: ‘What did she say?-Just what she ought, of course. A lady always does.-.’ Here, the authorial voice reasserts itself on the narrative, and Emma’s internal thoughts and feelings flash through her mind:’While he spoke, Emma’s mind was most busy, and, with all the wonderful velocity of thought…..’ ”
-pg 145 “Jane Austen Emma: A Sourcebook” Edited by Paula Byrne Routledge Taylor & Francis Group London and New York 2004

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