Posted by: Kirk | April 24, 2022

4/24 Week in review….

“Had Jane Austen been granted her three score and ten – or more – how would she have fared in old age? Professionally, she would surely have grown in both output and reputation. If, as I believe, the three novels she had written at Chawton show an advance in artistic control over her material as well as greater profundity of feeling, promising even more for the future, equally the fragment left unfinished at her death, Sanditon, proves there was no waning in her powers of invention.”

-pg 222 Maggie Lane “Growing Older with Jane Austen” Robert Hall Limited

Austentatious Library shared a photo.

“[The Admiral] and his wife had taken their intended drive, and were returning home. Upon hearing how long a walk the young people had engaged in, they kindly offered a seat to any lady who might be particularly tired […]. The invitation was general and generally declined. The Miss Musgroves were not at all tired, and Mary was either offended by not being asked before any of the others, or what Louisa called the Elliot pride could not endure to make a third in a one-horse chaise.

The walking party had crossed the lane, and were surmounting an opposite stile and the Admiral was putting his horse into motion again, when Captain Wentworth cleared the hedge in a moment to say something to his sister. The something might be guessed by its effects.

‘Miss Elliot, I am sure you are tired,’ cried Mrs. Croft. ‘Do let us have the pleasure of taking you home. Here is excellent room for three, I assure you. If we were all like you, I believe we might sit four. You must, indeed, you must.’

Anne was still in the lane, and though instinctively beginning to decline, she was not allowed to proceed. The admiral’s kind urgency came in support of his wife’s: they would not be refused; they compressed themselves into the smallest possible space to leave her a corner, and Captain Wentworth, without saying a word, turned to her, and quietly obliged her to be assisted into the carriage.

Yes; he had done it. She was in the carriage, and felt that he had placed her there, that his will and his hands had done it, that she owed it to his perception of her fatigue, and his resolution to give her rest. She was very much affected by the view of his disposition towards her, which all these things made apparent. This little circumstance seemed the completion of all that had gone before. She understood him. He could not forgive her, but he could not be unfeeling.”

❤️📚 — MissLydia

#JaneAusten#Austen#AustentatiousLibrary#Persuasion#Chapter10#AnneElliot#CaptainWentworth#AdmiralCroft#MrsCroft#Persuasion1995

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“Anne Elliot, the elegant and charming heroine of Persuasion, is a good amateur pianist – certainly a better player than Emma Woodhouse, though probably not in the same class as Jane Fairfax. But Anne receives none of the plaudits and gratitude which invariably follow the performances of those young ladies, for she is essentially a Cinderella figure(in this, though in little else, she is like Fanny Price), even to the extent of being provided with a pair of sisters who, if not physically ugly, are certainly very deficient in that beauty of character which Anne possesses in such large measure.” -pg 111 Patrick Piggott “The Innocent Diversion: A study of Music in the life and writings of Jane Austen” Douglas Cleverdon Publish.


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